A High Level Study Of Mac Jones' Game

Inspector_50

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After watching Lazar's video analysis, I can see why scout and analysts rated him downward. Not a single highlight reel throw in a 40-minute video! No super-tight window throws. To some it means receivers must be open for Jones to complete a pass. What Lazar described was manipulating the defense and doing quick reads and rapid decision making and throwing to the open man. And in a couple of the plays, throwing the man open.

Brady has been called a system QB and dink-and-dunk passe from the beginning. No one except Pats fans and a some analysts saw that decision making, accurate throws, and reading the defense, not 70-yards-in-the-air passes, was what made Brady so good, what is between his ears. That was the real basis of his success, and analysts aren't going to change their minds now. They still don't make the connection that Brady's biggest attribute was his brain.

Jones isn't likely to be the next Brady, but he has a better shot to be the next Patriots franchise QB than I thought, and I already thought very highly of him. Time will tell, and I hope he sits until 2022, but I have high hopes.
I would rather he just be the next Mac Jones, and keep that level of thought process. Its probably good that Cam was sandwiched between, so he takes over for Cam rather than Brady.
 

DarnSyd

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We saw Patrick Mahomes make a lot of off-platform throws in the Super Bowl, trying to hit receivers who had broken off their routes and were scrambling to find open spots. Very athletic, very unpredictable, very exciting. Very inefficient.

In that same game we saw his opponent remain in the pocket and hit his receivers in stride while they were running their routes. Simple. Boring. Effective.
It's odd that Mahomes is viewed as a great athlete and Jones is viewed as an immobile QB, when Jones ran faster and jumped higher in his pro-day than Mahomes did at his combine.
 

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It's odd that Mahomes is viewed as a great athlete and Jones is viewed as an immobile QB, when Jones ran faster and jumped higher in his pro-day than Mahomes did at his combine.
Mahomes despite what people want to believe is a pocket QB that will run if something opens up. He is a passer, if he gets pressure he is going to feel it the same way a so called immobile guy is going to, but like all QB's the best most consistent way to combat that, is to get rid of the ball faster, or change up routes to hot routes and cut off routes before the snap. The wrong thing to do is run around for 10 seconds, we saw this in the superbowl. The adjustment to a pass rush is not to run backwards, because for every one time you make some play that ends up on sports center, you also take 3 20 yard sacks.
 

spacecrime

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Mahomes despite what people want to believe is a pocket QB that will run if something opens up. He is a passer, if he gets pressure he is going to feel it the same way a so called immobile guy is going to, but like all QB's the best most consistent way to combat that, is to get rid of the ball faster, or change up routes to hot routes and cut off routes before the snap. The wrong thing to do is run around for 10 seconds, we saw this in the superbowl.
Mahommes was very effective at running around when they played the Pats last year. The Bucs just had a much better defense than we did, that's all.
 

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For years I have been frustrated by the definition of "athletic" being deconstructed to only mean fast and/or strong.

Hand eye coordination is an athletic skill, so are quickness, determination, know-how, and about a hundred other things that contribute to athletic success.

Larry Bird was a great athlete, so is TFB, and Mac might be one too.
 

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I posted a while ago that I watched a segment that they had on Waddle and Smith as to how good receivers they were.

What I came away with was the ball was delivered to them on time and accurately. Long routes, middle routes, short routes, coming out of breaks, being covered, it didn't matter. The ball was delivered on time and only where they could catch it. In any of those clips neither receiver had to make great catches, They didn't have to reach, turn or leap for the ball. It was right on the money every time.

That is what sold me on Mac big time. The segment was not about Mac but that is what impressed me the most.
 

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Mike Reiss made an excellent (as usual) point about people who are worried about the system when it relates to the differences between Jones and Newton. He reminded us of the game where Jacoby had to start in place of Brady who was suspended and jimmy G who had been hurt in the Dolphins game. The Patriots ran all kinds of plays for Jacoby that they'd never run for Tom. Reiss said that's because the offensive system in NE is so broad.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkN0gbuWROg
 

Inspector_50

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Mike Reiss made an excellent (as usual) point about people who are worried about the system when it relates to the differences between Jones and Newton. He reminded us of the game where Jacoby had to start in place of Brady who was suspended and jimmy G who had been hurt in the Dolphins game. The Patriots ran all kinds of plays for Jacoby that they'd never run for Tom. Reiss said that's because the offensive system in NE is so broad.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkN0gbuWROg
Yeah but we were shutout at home in one of those Brissett games. lol. I would maybe use a different example. Most good teams build their system around the players and the QB, other teams try to make a player fit their system. I am not sure the patriots do the later.
 

Phil Elliott

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For years I have been frustrated by the definition of "athletic" being deconstructed to only mean fast and/or strong.

Hand eye coordination is an athletic skill, so are quickness, determination, know-how, and about a hundred other things that contribute to athletic success.

Larry Bird was a great athlete, so is TFB, and Mac might be one too.
Thank you, thank you, thank you. The idea that Brady, who was drafted by MLB, Jones and others who don't necessarily jump high or run fast aren't great athlete is ridiculous.
 
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Mac Jones’ second pro day concluded with some flair, the result of a mere two minutes of planning and execution that drew a smile from Bill Belichick and everyone else in attendance.

Of course, Belichick and the New England Patriots didn’t draft the Alabama quarterback with the No. 15 pick in the NFL Draft last week because of a triple-option touchdown reception. Rather, it was the rest of Jones’ pro day that yielded a snapshot of his true character, competitiveness and passion for the game.

That pro day was a small part of the Jones evaluation and a glimpse into his much larger body of work. He took ownership of his 65-throw script, meticulously combing through every detail in the days leading up to his March 30 audition at Alabama’s Hank Crisp Indoor Facility.

“Mac is a control freak. He likes having the keys and being in the driver’s seat,” said David Morris, one of Jones’ throwing coaches. “I like that. Any of the good ones I’ve been around, they want to be the guy all the time.”

Jones didn’t love his March 23 pro day, so he rewrote the script for the second session. He collaborated with Morris and Joe Dickinson, another throwing coach, who has worked with Jones for about 12 years.

Jones also sought input from Alabama receivers DeVonta Smith and Jaylen Waddle and running back Najee Harris to ensure they were happy with the plan. But because Smith (dislocated finger) and Waddle (broken ankle) were recovering from injuries and weren’t sure if they’d participate in the pro day, Jones added two backup scripts to the workload.

Jones wanted to accomplish three particular goals that day: show off his arm strength that had been heavily questioned during the pre-draft process, spotlight his mobility in the pocket and fulfill requests from teams that hoped to see certain throws.

“Pro day, we always have a blank canvas,” Morris said. “We create it and collaborate what we want to do. We have a plan, show what we need to show. I’ve never quite had a guy completely take over and kind of even destroy the canvas and say, ‘Let’s rethink it a little bit more.’ I like that because he knows what he wants. He likes things a certain way. He’s very intelligent. When he’s thinking about an operation, he’s not only thinking about himself. He’s thinking about everyone else around him. So he wanted to simplify some things but also really dive deep in a way to show what we wanted to show. It was fascinating to me because it was unique.”

Morris, the founder of QB Country in Mobile, Ala., was Eli Manning’s backup at Ole Miss and trained him during the latter half of his NFL career. Morris has prepared Daniel Jones, Gardner Minshew, Jake Fromm, Paxton Lynch, Nick Mullens, A.J. McCarron and Matt Barkley for previous drafts.

He began working with Mac Jones in January after the Crimson Tide’s national championship run and was instantly impressed with his preparation. One example: Jones has a pen with six colors that he uses to take notes from each of his games and opponents — red ink for the red zone, green ink for the green area, another color for third downs and so on.

The Senior Bowl was another eye-opener for Morris, who attended Jones’ practices and texted him observations after each workout. But after a full day of meetings, Jones retreated to the quarterbacks room in the convention center to study that day’s tape — until Senior Bowl director Jim Nagy’s staff had to ask Jones to leave at midnight in order to lock up the building — then combed through his notes in his hotel room until 2:30 a.m., when he finally returned Morris’ texts.

This happened on back-to-back nights. The players had to wake up by 6:30 each morning.

“You’ve got a guy who understands the opportunity,” Morris said. “His worst nightmare is to just miss something and not be prepared. Whatever it takes to know everything forwards and backwards, that’s going to be what he does. It’s over the top from a preparation standpoint, but there’s a reason he had the best year in NCAA history this year. The kid knows how to prepare.”

Jones completed a record-breaking 77.4 percent of his passes last season for a school record of 4,500 yards along with 41 touchdowns and four interceptions. His strengths were his ability to read the defense before the snap to make the correct checks, process the look after the snap and fly through his progressions and deliver the ball accurately and on time — all a result of that preparation. His footwork and feel in the pocket were other strong attributes.

Morris appreciated that whole package during their work together. While training, they’d run through each play four times — first as a walkthrough, then an ideal rep when everything goes perfectly, then a contested rep when a defender breaks the pocket and finally a worst-case scenario rep to yield off-platform throws or to simply find the right outlet to ensure a bad play doesn’t become a turnover.

Jones planned to spotlight those strengths at his second pro day. And while conducting remote meetings with NFL coaches, Jones asked if they had any requests for his final audition.

Jones, who privately hoped to be drafted by the Patriots, hit it off with offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels during their meeting, and Jones incorporated some New England elements into that workout, including its pass drops.

He also made throws off-platform, rolled out to the left and right and simulated footwork in a broken pocket. Jones ran a 4.82-second 40-yard dash, so he won’t race away from many people, but he wanted to prove there are other ways to display athleticism and mobility.

And with the questions over arm strength, Jones installed 20 deep balls — roughly 30 percent of his throws. One of those passes traveled nearly 70 yards to Smith, who ran a handful of routes while Waddle remained out.

Jones’ first pass of the day, however, remarkably scraped off the roof.

“The whole point was I’m a little tired of hearing ‘arm strength issues’ from people, so he’s like, ‘Let’s throw the heck out of it,'” Morris said. “I’m like, ‘Fine with me; let’s do it.’ The (first) ball hit the ceiling. I’ve never seen that happen. I’ve seen it happen on punts once or twice. He was throwing a go ball to the sideline from the middle of the field. He threw the crap out of it. It would have been a strike. That would have shaken certain people because it’s the first play, and you want a completion. He was like, ‘OK, let’s go; we’re about to nail this thing.'”

Jones had a strong day overall and wanted to stamp it with an exclamation point. During the final walkthrough a day earlier, Jones closed the script with a completion, then spontaneously told tight end Miller Forristall to line up at fullback in front of Harris and instructed the pair on their triple-option responsibilities. Jones faked the handoff to Forristall and pitched to Harris, who threw it high to Jones in the end zone. Jones made a one-handed leaping catch, kicked his legs wide to replicate the Michael Jordan silhouette and excitedly said they’d run it just like that at the pro day.

The play paid homage to his high school coach, the late Corky Rogers, who ran the Wing-T offense at The Bolles School in Jacksonville, Fla., and also to Belichick’s family roots at Navy. Belichick couldn’t help but smile when the plan was put to action.


“He’s a lot of fun,” Morris said of Jones. “He knows how to keep it light. When you have a good day, you can do that kind of stuff. He talked about (Rogers) often. That was a neat thing for him to be able to do that. And he did bring up Navy and Belichick, so I thought it was kind of fascinating.”

Belichick and McDaniels liked what they saw, but they still needed some luck to get Jones in the draft. After he fell past the San Francisco 49ers at No. 3 and the Carolina Panthers at No. 8, the New Orleans Saints began calling teams about trading up from No. 28, according to a source. The Saints couldn’t find anyone who wanted to move back that far, but they had a deal in the works to get No. 16 from the Arizona Cardinals — one pick too late.

The Patriots’ selection capped a mighty year-long rise from Jones, who sat behind Jalen Hurts and Tua Tagovailoa for two and a half seasons and then had to beat out five-star freshman Bryce Young for the starting job in 2020.

Now, Jones is the Patriots’ franchise quarterback-in-training.

“The way he understood the moment and the magnitude of each opportunity was very different to me,” Morris said. “I don’t know that anybody necessarily thought he’d have the year he had. But getting to know him, it really makes a lot of sense.”
 

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Yeah but we were shutout at home in one of those Brissett games. lol. I would maybe use a different example. Most good teams build their system around the players and the QB, other teams try to make a player fit their system. I am not sure the patriots do the later.
Well, the point is more that the system can adapt. The Patriots have won games doing many different things. In the games against the Colts in like 2014 we just ran it down their throats, whereas other games Brady won with his arm. The Patriots are the most flexible in terms of altering what they do.
 

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Well, the point is more that the system can adapt. The Patriots have won games doing many different things. In the games against the Colts in like 2014 we just ran it down their throats, whereas other games Brady won with his arm. The Patriots are the most flexible in terms of altering what they do.
Very much so, but in order to do that you have to have flexible players. Where as you said we can win a game a certain way where a QB like Cam or Brissett can do it, in another game could they do what Brady did to also win when the game plan changes drastically. I think its very important to have players that can adapt to that and that just throwing the system at some players who cannot is going to fail. I mean I think most teams run about the same system offensively other than the teams that have the run first QB's, and when those teams get into playoff games or against good teams, they run into issues. Ravens for example. I also think you have to have a very patient QB. The 2004 colts playoff game, Manning was getting killed yet their run game was owning us, but Manning could not be patient to keep handing the ball off even though the game was not out of control. Last years superbowl, short quick passing was working to move the ball against Tampa, but Mahomes kept going back to 7 step drop backs and looking for the big play. I still think a system is built around what a player does, and not that a player is put into a system and succeeds, because forcing a player to play a certain way especially at QB when that is not their strength is not going to work well consistently. Its not magic to run the ball a lot when the other team cannot stop the run, the magic comes when you have to go against a teams strength and can your players adjust to doing that or changing in the middle of a game, which the pats players have had to do.
 

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Well, the point is more that the system can adapt. The Patriots have won games doing many different things. In the games against the Colts in like 2014 we just ran it down their throats, whereas other games Brady won with his arm. The Patriots are the most flexible in terms of altering what they do.
But wait, if you read the game day thread Josh is an awful play caller.😅
 
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