Andrew Cuomo

johnlocke

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N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo Will Face Impeachment Investigation by New York State Lawmakers​

Judiciary committee would have authority to interview witnesses, subpoena documents​



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New York state Gov. Andrew Cuomo visited a vaccination site in Manhattan on Monday.​

PHOTO: SETH WENIG/PRESS POOL
By
Jimmy Vielkind
Updated March 11, 2021 8:00 pm ET


ALBANY, N. Y.—The New York State Assembly said on Thursday that it would start an impeachment investigation into Gov. Andrew Cuomo, vowing to look into allegations that he behaved inappropriately toward female aides and his administration’s handling of Covid-19 deaths in state nursing homes.

After lawmakers met privately Thursday afternoon, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, a Democrat from the Bronx, said the Democrat-dominated chamber’s judiciary committee would have authority to interview witnesses, subpoena documents and evaluate evidence as members consider possible articles of impeachment.

Mr. Heastie said that “the reports of accusations concerning the governor are serious.” State Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins, a Democrat from Yonkers, has already called on Mr. Cuomo to resign.
Representatives for the Democratic governor didn’t respond to requests for comment on the Assembly’s latest moves.

No New York governor has been impeached in more than a century. After an inquiry, the chamber could consider articles of impeachment that, if approved, would temporarily suspend Mr. Cuomo’s authority. The governor would then be tried before members of the Democrat-controlled state Senate and judges of the state’s Court of Appeals, who could remove him from office upon a two-thirds vote.

State officials on Wednesday referred a complaint that Mr. Cuomo inappropriately touched a female aide at the Executive Mansion to the Albany Police Department.

The latest complaint, which involves a woman who still works on the governor’s Executive Chamber staff, stems from an alleged incident last year, people familiar with the matter said. She is the fourth woman to accuse the third-term Democrat of inappropriate behavior or sexual harassment while they worked for him.
On Wednesday, a representative of the New York State Police and Beth Garvey, the governor’s acting counsel, separately reached out to the Albany Police Department, state and police officials said. Ms. Garvey spoke with Deputy Chief Edward Donohue on Wednesday evening, they said.

Officer Steve Smith, a spokesman for the Albany Police Department, said that the department hadn’t received a formal complaint from the woman and that there is no active investigation. Officer Smith said Albany Police had reached out to the woman’s attorney to offer police services with respect to her allegation.
Ms. Garvey said Executive Chamber officials followed state policy by contacting the Albany Police Department about the allegation after they learned the woman hadn’t filed her own complaint with police. “If they [alleged victims] decline, the agency has an obligation to reach out themselves and inform the department of the allegation,” Ms. Garvey said.
A lawyer for the woman said she would speak through the legal process.



Gov. Cuomo Apologizes but Won’t Resign, He Says at Press Conference

Gov. Cuomo Apologizes but Won’t Resign, He Says at Press Conference

At a press conference following allegations of sexual harassment and calls from some to resign, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he apologized if he offended anyone or caused anyone pain by past actions, but he said he isn’t going to resign. Photo: Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo (Video from 3/3/21)

The woman became upset last week after watching Mr. Cuomo give a news conference addressing other allegations of inappropriate behavior toward female aides, people familiar with the matter said. The woman then told a colleague what happened, and the colleague then alerted members of Mr. Cuomo’s senior staff, the people said.
Mr. Cuomo’s aides referred the matter this week to independent investigators overseen by Attorney General Letitia James, the people said.

In a statement on Wednesday, Mr. Cuomo said: “As I said yesterday, I have never done anything like this. The details of this report are gut-wrenching. I am not going to speak to the specifics of this or any other allegation given the ongoing review, but I am confident in the result of the Attorney General’s report.”

At the Capitol Thursday morning, nearly 60 Democratic members of the New York state Legislature called for Mr. Cuomo’s resignation and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said during a news conference that “he can no longer serve as governor” amid the accusations of inappropriate behavior toward female aides and a federal probe of Covid-19 deaths in nursing homes.

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New York state Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, shown last June, has questioned whether Gov. Andrew Cuomo can remain in office.​

PHOTO: HANS PENNINK/ASSOCIATED PRESS

In the statement, the members calling for Mr. Cuomo’s resignation cited the governor’s alleged behavior as well as actions taken by the governor’s advisers to hold back from the public a fuller accounting of the death toll in long-term-care facilities amid the coronavirus pandemic.
 

johnlocke

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo Aides Called Former Staffers to Discredit Accuser​

Some recipients of the calls said that the outreach felt like attempts to intimidate them​



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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s top aide, Melissa DeRosa, pictured in 2018, coordinated the outreach, according to people familiar with the effort.​

PHOTO: MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
By
Khadeeja Safdar
,
Deanna Paul
and
Jimmy Vielkind
Updated March 11, 2021 10:43 pm ET


In the days after New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo was first accused of sexual harassment by a former aide, the governor’s office called at least six former employees either to find out if they had heard from the accuser or to glean information about her in conversations that some said they saw as attempts to intimidate them.

Some of the people who received the calls said they hadn’t heard from the administration in months before getting the call about the accuser. One said a caller encouraged them to give reporters any information discrediting the accuser, Lindsey Boylan, who worked as an economic adviser for the Cuomo administration between 2015 and 2018.

The calls were made by current administration officials and former aides who are still close to the governor’s office, according to several recipients. The outreach came at the behest of Melissa DeRosa, the governor’s top aide, according to people familiar with the effort.

“I felt intimidated, and I felt bewildered,” said Ana Liss, a former aide to the governor who received one of the calls.

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has denied touching anyone inappropriately and has apologized for any behavior that might have been misinterpreted.​

PHOTO: SETH WENIG/PRESS POOL

Ms. Liss, who earlier this month accused Mr. Cuomo of inappropriate behavior, said that Rich Azzopardi, a senior adviser to Mr. Cuomo, phoned her on Dec. 21. The call came eight days after Ms. Boylan said in a post on Twitter that the governor sexually harassed her.

Ms. Liss hadn’t worked for the governor in more than five years and couldn’t remember the last time the administration had been in touch, she said.

She said Mr. Azzopardi reminded her on the call of how much she had accomplished during her time working for the governor and asked her if she had received a message from Ms. Boylan. She told him she hadn’t and said the conversation ended on a friendly note.

Mr. Azzopardi said in a statement: “After Ms. Boylan’s tweets in December, she, and her lawyers and members of the press began reaching out to former members of the Chamber, many of whom never worked with her. Those former members of the Chamber called to let various staff people know and convey that they were upset by the outreach. As a result, we proactively reached out to some former colleagues to check in and make sure they had a heads up.”

Mr. Azzopardi said the calls weren’t coordinated by Ms. DeRosa. “There was no directed effort—this outreach happened organically when everyone’s phone started to blow up.” He added that they didn’t intimidate anyone.
In Twitter posts after this story was published, Ms. Boylan said she didn’t reach out to anyone in December and didn’t have a lawyer at the time.
Three former employees from his time as governor and one current aide to Mr. Cuomo have accused the governor of inappropriate behavior or sexual harassment in the workplace, prompting calls from Republicans and high-ranking state Democrats for him to resign.
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‘I felt intimidated, and I felt bewildered,’ said Ana Liss, a former aide to the governor who received one of the calls.​

PHOTO: LIBBY MARCH FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
Democrats who dominate the state Assembly have launched an impeachment investigation that will look at the allegations as well as how the Cuomo administration handled Covid-19 in nursing homes. State Attorney General Letitia James is now overseeing an investigation into the accusations made by the former aides and how Mr. Cuomo’s office handled the complaints.

Mr. Cuomo has denied touching anyone inappropriately and has apologized for any behavior that might have been misinterpreted. He has also called for New Yorkers to withhold judgment until Ms. James’s investigation is complete.
Ms. Boylan has said Mr. Cuomo tried to kiss her on the lips in his office and, during a 2017 flight on his plane, suggested they play strip poker.
A spokeswoman for Mr. Cuomo has denied Ms. Boylan’s allegations.
Another former aide, Charlotte Bennett, said Mr. Cuomo asked about her sex life and whether she had relationships with older men. Ms. Liss has said he asked her if she had a boyfriend, touched her on her lower back at a reception and once kissed her hand when she rose from her desk. A fourth woman this week accused the governor of touching her inappropriately during an encounter at the Executive Mansion last year.
In a statement on Wednesday, Mr. Cuomo said: “As I said yesterday, I have never done anything like this. The details of this report are gut-wrenching. I am not going to speak to the specifics of this or any other allegation given the ongoing review, but I am confident in the result of the Attorney General’s report.”
The governor, in previous statements, has encouraged women to come forward and said his office would cooperate with Ms. James’s inquiry.
But Mr. Cuomo and his aides have gone after accusers and rivals in the past, according to court documents and former staffers.
In October 2000, Mr. Cuomo, when he was the secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, was accused of sex discrimination and harassment in an internal memo filed by Susan Gaffney, a former HUD inspector general. She accused Mr. Cuomo and other HUD officials of intimidation and harassment after she launched a congressionally requested audit into some of the work Mr. Cuomo had overseen.
Ms. Gaffney testified to Congress in 1998 that Mr. Cuomo’s aides attempted to smear her, including publicizing an anonymous letter that Mr. Cuomo had allegedly received saying she was targeting minorities.

At one point, Mr. Cuomo assured her that he had nothing to do with the actions by key aides, she said. “I suggested that, if his key aides were acting without his approval, he should fire them; the Secretary did not respond,” she said in the 1998 testimony, adding that tactics used by Mr. Cuomo and his aides were “dirty tricks” to force her to resign.
Ms. Gaffney couldn’t be reached.
After Ms. Boylan tweeted her account in December, she said in a Feb. 24 Medium post that media outlets received “parts of a supposed confidential personnel file” from her time with the administration. Ms. Boylan said in the post that she had never seen the file and that it was an effort to smear her.
In response to Ms. Boylan’s claim about her personnel record, Beth Garvey, the acting counsel to the governor, said: “With certain limited exceptions, as a general matter, it is within a government entity’s discretion to share redacted employment records, including in instances when members of the media ask for such public information and when it is for the purpose of correcting inaccurate or misleading statements.”
Ms. Boylan also said in the Medium post that “the Governor’s loyalists called around town, asking about me.”
One recipient of a call said the caller asked in December if Ms. Boylan had been in touch with the recipient, and what the recipient thought of her claims.
Another recipient of a call said that a caller, a current official in the Cuomo administration, asked if reporters had been contacted about Ms. Boylan and wanted to confirm the nature of the recipient’s experience with Ms. Boylan. “The subtext was clear: I was being asked to dish dirt on her,” the recipient said.
 

Providence Colt

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If Cuomo was a republican, the GOP would be defending him.
Sure would be. Our resident true believers would be blowing up this thread with “ZOMG! DEEP STATE! THOSE LYING SLUTS!”

I for one glad that I don’t behave like that when it’s “one of our guys” time in the barrel. Being principled has its drawbacks, I suppose.
 

deec77

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I don’t know how about the novel concept Innocent until proven guilty....

~Dee~
 
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patswin

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I don’t know how about the novel concept Innocent until proven guilty....

~Dee~
Agree. Clearly there's some allegations here. But as I posted earlier, he should get due process. The woke crowd has a field day denying due process to those they hate, and if I don't demand a fair investigation, I'm just as much of a d-bag as all those that went after Kavanaugh (and were proven to be liars).
On the other hand, the deaths of all those victims should be the true focus here, and I know I am repeating myself but clearly the intent is to deflect from that. That too deserves due process, although it easy to condemn him at this point based on that he sent those people to nursing homes, and that he lied about about it, which has already been substantiated.
 

aloyouis

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Agree. Clearly there's some allegations here. But as I posted earlier, he should get due process. The woke crowd has a field day denying due process to those they hate, and if I don't demand a fair investigation, I'm just as much of a d-bag as all those that went after Kavanaugh (and were proven to be liars).
On the other hand, the deaths of all those victims should be the true focus here, and I know I am repeating myself but clearly the intent is to deflect from that. That too deserves due process, although it easy to condemn him at this point based on that he sent those people to nursing homes, and that he lied about about it, which has already been substantiated.
Agreed. Investigate the murders. Investigate the sexual harassment.
 

Providence Colt

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The most principaled high ranking unpolitician was Trump. Prove me wrong.
Too funny. Reality TV star fucked with the establishment.
He was a Democrat until he start spewing Republican talking points and then he gained a legion of devoted, non-thinking followers.

That’s precisely what happened.
 

aloyouis

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He was a Democrat until he start spewing Republican talking points and then he gained a legion of devoted, non-thinking followers.

That’s precisely what happened.
He was a Democrat until he became a thinking person.
 

HSanders

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there's no "personal integrity"in saying something like the last 2 posts. things are rarely all or nothing, and they aren't here either.
both parties have had converts for a myriad of reasons. i think people who convert from r to d or vice versa, by and large, do it after personal experiences change their mind. there's nothing wrong with that. in fact, i'd call that intelligent depending on the reasons. trump didn't convert much other than the letter after his name.
 

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo Should Not Resign, Say Half of New Yorkers in a Poll​

Democratic governor faces allegations of sexual harassment and criticism over handling of Covid-19 in nursing homes​

Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaking at a vaccination site this month in New York City.​

PHOTO: SETH WENIG/PRESS POOL
By
Jimmy Vielkind
Updated March 15, 2021 6:50 pm ET

ALBANY, N.Y.—Half of New Yorkers say Gov. Andrew Cuomo shouldn’t resign from office, while 35% say he should, as he faces allegations of inappropriate behavior toward female aides and criticism over the state’s handling of Covid-19 in nursing homes, according to a new poll.

Thirty-five percent of poll respondents surveyed last week said they believed Mr. Cuomo had committed sexual harassment, compared with 24% who said he hadn’t and 41% who said they were unsure, according to a Siena College Research Institute poll released Monday. The poll found 57% of voters surveyed said they were satisfied with how the governor has handled the allegations.

The Siena poll of 804 voters was conducted from March 8 to 12 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.1 percentage points. On March 11, Albany lawmakers launched an impeachment investigation of the governor’s conduct.
Three women who worked for Mr. Cuomo as well as one woman currently on the governor’s Executive Chamber staff have accused him of sexual harassment or inappropriate behavior. Attorney General Letitia James is overseeing an investigation into the allegations.

Mr. Cuomo has said he never inappropriately touched anybody. He has previously apologized to anyone who said his workplace behavior made them uncomfortable.




Gov. Cuomo Apologizes but Won’t Resign, He Says at Press Conference

Gov. Cuomo Apologizes but Won’t Resign, He Says at Press Conference

At a March 3 press conference following allegations of sexual harassment and calls from some to resign, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he apologized if he offended anyone or caused anyone pain by past actions, but he said he isn’t going to resign. Photo: Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo


On Monday, Mr. Cuomo appeared at an event on Long Island to promote the state’s Covid-19 vaccination campaign in Black communities. The governor, 63 years old, said he would be vaccinated “in the coming days.”
Mr. Cuomo didn’t directly address the allegations against him during the event, which was closed to the press but streamed by the governor’s office. He said he learned from the response to Hurricane Sandy that you “get up stronger” if you’re knocked down.

The poll shows less support for a resignation among Black voters and respondents who are over 55 years old. According to the survey, 69% of Black respondents said Mr. Cuomo shouldn’t resign, compared with 45% of white respondents. Fifty-eight percent of respondents older than 55 said Mr. Cuomo shouldn’t step down.

Poll spokesman Steven Greenberg said there was a partisan split and geographic split in the survey’s results, and said a majority of New York City voters said the governor shouldn’t step down.
“Nearly two-thirds of Republicans say Cuomo should resign; however, 61% of Democrats and 46% of independents, a plurality, say he should not,” Mr. Greenberg said.

Democrats who control the state Assembly have said they would launch an impeachment investigation, and a majority of the members in that 150-seat body have either said Mr. Cuomo should resign or be impeached.
On Monday, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie told reporters that the chamber is hiring an outside law firm to help with its impeachment investigation. Mr. Heastie, a Democrat from the Bronx, said the investigation would have a broad focus and be completed expeditiously.


Lindsey Boylan, 36, has said Mr. Cuomo kissed her on her lips and suggested “let’s play strip poker” during a ride on the state airplane. Ana Liss, 35, has said Mr. Cuomo asked if she had a boyfriend and once kissed her hand when she worked near his office at the Capitol. Charlotte Bennett, 25, has said Mr. Cuomo made overtures to her for sex.
A fourth woman has said Mr. Cuomo touched her inappropriately during an encounter at the Executive Mansion last year.
Mr. Cuomo has denied Ms. Boylan’s account and said he never inappropriately touched anybody.
Ms. Bennett spoke for more than four hours with investigators from the attorney general’s probe on Monday and provided more than 120 pages of documents, according to her attorney Debra Katz.
Mr. Cuomo has remained defiant amid growing calls for his resignation from within his own party: U.S. Sens. Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand joined 16 Democratic members of the state’s House of Representatives delegation on Friday in saying the governor should step down.

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said Monday that President Biden hadn’t spoken personally with Mr. Cuomo about his situation. She called the allegations “troubling,” but repeated the White House position that the president thinks the attorney general investigation into Mr. Cuomo is appropriate.
“The investigation needs to be quick and thorough, consistent with how serious these allegations are,” she said. She also said the White House would continue to work with the New York governor on Covid-19 response.
 
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