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johnlocke

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This is a long-overdue thread about our enemy from the east, and make no mistake they are an enemy.

The west completely sold out the Fee State ofHong Kong to Chinese rule. Utterly despicable.

What the hell are they holding over us. I mean we have the total moral high ground yet wet we bend over continually for these basteges.

 

aloyouis

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You do realize that he UI on here will defend china?

They have no choice or they run afoul of their programming.

They simply can not think for themselves.

Can. Not.
 

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Undertaker #59*

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One thing I don't hear talked about a lot, and I would leave it to those who know more than me, but doesn't China own the bulk of the US National debt?
 
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johnlocke

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One thing I don't hear talked about a lot, and I would leave it to those who know more than me, but doesn't China own the bulk of the US National debt?

A great deal of it, yes. And that's something they lord over the unprincipled politicians that love deficit spending.
 

foobahl

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One thing I don't hear talked about a lot, and I would leave it to those who know more than me, but doesn't China own the bulk of the US National debt?
This is one of the better arguments for Trump2020. Name anyone else with his experience in going bankrupt on someone. Seriously though, I think when you owe anyone that much, you are actually in the drivers seat. The only way I see that not holding true would be enter BSF. He/she/they/them could explain it much more in depth than I could. Guessing BSF is a he based on the hot rod thread, but I don't know.
 

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johnlocke

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After Chinese leader Xi Jinping ordered rural poverty eliminated by 2020, bureaucrats in the southwestern city of Mianyang got busy—with paperwork.

Instructed to devote 70% of their time to the campaign, they diligently filled out forms certifying compliance, a practice known as “leaving marks,” said Pang Jia, a local judicial clerk who joined the effort. When higher-ups demanded photographic proof of their home visits, some aid workers made up for missing winter photos by posing in cold-weather clothing during summer house calls, Ms. Pang said.

Since taking power in late 2012, Mr. Xi has realigned Chinese politics with his domineering style and a top-down drive to forge a centralized state under the Communist Party. But his efforts are running into an old foe: bureaucracy.
Party observers say the drive for centralization in a sprawling nation too often fosters bureaucratic inertia, duplicity and other unproductive practices that are aimed at satisfying Beijing and protecting careers but threaten to undermine Mr. Xi’s goals.
Indeed, some local officials have become so focused on pleasing Mr. Xi and fulfilling party mandates that they can neglect their basic duties as public servants, sometimes with dire results.
As the new coronavirus spread in Wuhan in late 2019, for instance, local authorities were afraid to share bad news with Beijing. That impeded the national response and contributed to the death toll, according to a Wall Street Journal investigation.

Mr. Xi and other senior officials publicly lamented how front-line bureaucrats were consumed with paperwork instead of fighting the contagion. Officials dedicated hours each day to filling out multiple documents for agencies making overlapping requests for information, including residents’ body temperatures and symptoms.
Reports of fraudulent and wasteful projects have marred Mr. Xi’s campaign to eliminate rural poverty, a centerpiece of his “China Dream”—particularly after 2015, when he ordered that officials sign pledges to meet poverty-relief targets and be held accountable if things went wrong.

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Rural farmers in China's Sichuan Province last September.​

PHOTO: ROMAN PILIPEY/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
In the eastern city of Fuyang, local officials were disciplined in 2019 for ordering homes in some rural villages to be painted white so that they would look nicer to party bosses—spending the equivalent of $1.2 million—without addressing deficient roads and drainage systems. Party inspectors found that local officials started the “whitewashing” as a way to deliver quick results after higher-ups demanded that residents’ homes be fixed up within three months. Even that project was haphazard, with many houses only partially painted, according to a state television documentary.

Provincial authorities denounced the episode as a vanity project and a highly damaging act of “formalism”—the official epithet for box-ticking and “CYA” behavior that prioritizes form over substance—and replaced Fuyang’s top official.

Such unpleasantness aside, Mr. Xi last month declared a “complete victory” in China’s war on poverty.
Locally, officials say they keep getting overwhelmed with bureaucratic demands from above, often involving repetitive meetings and excessive paperwork that sometimes weighs in at hundreds of pounds, according to state media accounts.
One grass-roots official complained to the official Xinhua News Agency about not having time to do real work after participating in 15 meetings over 23 days. The agency also quoted a county chief as saying, “If we don’t hold meetings, how do we show that we’ve implemented our work?”

The dangers of box-ticking have worried Communist governments since the days of Stalin and Mao. Historians say Mao was so troubled by the phenomenon that he repeatedly launched campaigns to shake up what he saw as an ossifying and increasingly self-serving party bureaucracy. Today, under Mr. Xi, the problem appears to have returned with a vengeance.
“As Xi controls more strictly from above, the people below face far too many orders and rules and choose to do the safest thing,” said Ryan Manuel, managing director of Hong Kong-based research firm Official China, which analyzes Communist Party governance.

Mr. Xi has repeatedly spurred efforts to stamp out excessive bureaucracy, calling it a “major enemy” of the party and the people. In January, he ordered the Communist Party’s top disciplinary commission to spare no effort in curbing such behavior and demanded “excellent results” befitting the party’s centenary in July, according to state media.
 
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Mao Zedong also launched efforts to shake up China’s party bureaucracy.​

PHOTO: PAOLO KOCH/GAMMA-RAPHO/GETTY IMAGES

In a sign of how seriously leaders are taking the issue, the party’s disciplinary commission started disclosing nationwide data on “formalism” and “bureaucratism” offenses in 2020.
About 108,000 people were punished for such misconduct in 2019, including demotions, while roughly 117,600 people were warned or disciplined last year. The number of headlines referring to “formalism” in Chinese media has surged.

Distracted officials​

Chinese labor activist Han Dongfang says the effort put into satisfying Mr. Xi’s demands amounts to political performance art that distracts from other work, like monitoring workplace safety.
His Hong Kong-based advocacy group, China Labour Bulletin, has documented a number of industrial accidents over the past year in which they believe local unions neglected their duties due to their preoccupation with Mr. Xi’s priorities in eliminating rural poverty and instilling political loyalty.

“It’s like a local fire brigade seeing a fire in a neighboring district that’s getting more attention, so they ignore the fire burning beside them and rush to join in at the other one, because they can score results there,” Mr. Han said.
Last March, Mr. Han said, after flooding at a coal mine in the central city of Xinyang killed seven workers, he called up a district labor union to ask what was being done to improve safety, only to be told that the official handling the incident was away helping with poverty-relief work in a rural village.

What does bureaucratic subterfuge signal about the future of the Chinese Communist Party? Join the conversation below.
A few months before a coal-mine fire in July in the central city of Zhangjiajie left three workers with severe burns, more than two dozen local union officials visited revolutionary memorials to honor Communist forces who participated in the 1934-35 “Long March,” a retreat over thousands of miles in search of a new revolutionary base, according to a report published by the city’s official trade-union federation.

During the daylong trip, arranged under the auspices of Mr. Xi’s campaign to remind party members to “stay true to our original aspirations,” the union officials dressed in 1930s-style military uniforms, toured a historical exhibition and sang revolutionary songs.

Mr. Han says he spoke to one participant, a union official, to voice his dismay. According to a transcript of their phone conversation published by China Labour Bulletin, the official cited manpower shortages that hampered the union’s ability to fulfill its duties, but also acknowledged that its officials have been pulled away from work by political-education events.
The unions cited by Mr. Han didn’t respond to queries.

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Xi Jinping delivers a New Year's address in Beijing on Dec. 31, in this photo released by the Xinhua News Agency.​

PHOTO: JU PENG/XINHUA/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Government workers complain that their WeChat messaging apps have become bureaucratic quagmires where they are overwhelmed by bosses sending round-the-clock demands by text. Some chat rooms created for work discussions devolved into what is colloquially known as kuakuaqun, or “groups of praise,” where subordinates speak sycophantically in support of superiors.

Some participants post emojis depicting genuflection “in order to make superiors happy,” while others fawningly say “boss, you’ve worked hard” or “boss, you’re brilliant,” according to “Combating Formalism,” a book released last year by a party publisher.

Grass-roots cadres often find themselves members of more than a hundred WeChat messaging groups, the Xinhua agency said in a December commentary lamenting the spread of “formalism” online. Rather than speaking to ordinary people to understand their needs, some officials focus on how to document and publicize their work to please superiors, it added.
Such brown-nosing “appears ridiculous to common folk and chills their hearts,” it said.

Seeking workarounds​

And yet, demands from Beijing keep coming.

After China launched in 2019 a mobile app known as Xuexi Qiangguo, which can translate as “Learn From Xi to Strengthen the Nation,” hundreds of millions of officials, party members, state-business employees and students have been required to download the software to educate themselves on Mr. Xi’s ideas and speeches.

Many officials and employers have demanded that subordinates demonstrate political zeal by earning points on the app through activities like quizzes and watching videos. The chore is vexing enough for some users to devise workarounds, such as using custom-made software to simulate usage of the app and meet point quotas.

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Party members employed by Tidal Star Group use a cellphone app that translates literally as 'Study to Make China Strong' during a weekly group session.​

PHOTO: JASON LEE/REUTERS

Some party members regard Xuexi Qiangguo as something “to deal with, and only seek to earn points to complete their study tasks,” Fang Shinan, a professor at Soochow University in the eastern city of Suzhou, wrote in an essay published July in the party-backed journal Governance.

Similar problems surfaced after Mr. Xi launched in August a national “clean plate” campaign to curb food waste, which state media said amounted to an estimated 35 million tons annually in China. Officials must deal firmly with this “shocking and distressing” problem, Mr. Xi said.

Racing to comply, some schools required students to answer one multiple-choice question “for every grain of rice wasted.” Others told students to sing songs and recite poetry celebrating the hard work that went into putting every rice grain into a meal.

In September, the Communist Party’s official newspaper, People’s Daily, published a letter from a parent of an elementary-school pupil in the central city of Nanchang complaining about how the school had asked parents to submit videos of their children singing the “Table Manners Song” after dinner with clean plates in their hands for 21 days straight.
“Such formalistic practices by the school has left many parents with a deep sense of helplessness and distaste, and we’d typically delete the videos after clocking in,” wrote the parent, Liu Jing.

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A student in Shanghai returns his empty plate last year during a campaign to eliminate food waste.​

PHOTO: DING TING/XINHUA/ZUMA PRESS

The backlash prompted a central-government office overseeing education policy to issue a notice in October criticizing schools for “formalism” in fighting food waste. It specifically called out requirements for students to “memorize and recite meal songs” and threats of punishment with additional test questions for those who waste rice.

Wasted time​

Some of Beijing’s proposed remedies only seem to encourage more bureaucracy. As the pandemic’s economic fallout heaped pressure on officials struggling to meet poverty-relief targets, party authorities ordered in April a fresh push to curb red tape.
Among its demands: compiling an anthology of Mr. Xi’s remarks on “formalism and bureaucratism” and making it required reading for all cadres.

Within weeks, a party publisher had released a 136-page volume featuring 182 passages, and government agencies and state businesses started arranging seminars for officials to study the text.
The publishing arm of the party’s disciplinary commission released six new books last year, including a comic, to teach officials how to recognize and prevent “formalistic” practices.

One book cited case studies of local officials caught plagiarizing and forging paperwork to satisfy Mr. Xi’s demands for more-rigorous ideological training. One way to curb such misconduct, the book suggests, is to study Mr. Xi’s ideas more closely.
“Only by studying hard and conscientiously acquiring a good grasp” of Mr. Xi’s political philosophy, the book said, “can we continuously improve our abilities and better fulfill our responsibilities.”
 

BostonTim

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im-308349

A student in Shanghai returns his empty plate last year during a campaign to eliminate food waste.​

PHOTO: DING TING/XINHUA/ZUMA PRESS

The backlash prompted a central-government office overseeing education policy to issue a notice in October criticizing schools for “formalism” in fighting food waste. It specifically called out requirements for students to “memorize and recite meal songs” and threats of punishment with additional test questions for those who waste rice.

Wasted time​

Some of Beijing’s proposed remedies only seem to encourage more bureaucracy. As the pandemic’s economic fallout heaped pressure on officials struggling to meet poverty-relief targets, party authorities ordered in April a fresh push to curb red tape.
Among its demands: compiling an anthology of Mr. Xi’s remarks on “formalism and bureaucratism” and making it required reading for all cadres.

Within weeks, a party publisher had released a 136-page volume featuring 182 passages, and government agencies and state businesses started arranging seminars for officials to study the text.
The publishing arm of the party’s disciplinary commission released six new books last year, including a comic, to teach officials how to recognize and prevent “formalistic” practices.

One book cited case studies of local officials caught plagiarizing and forging paperwork to satisfy Mr. Xi’s demands for more-rigorous ideological training. One way to curb such misconduct, the book suggests, is to study Mr. Xi’s ideas more closely.
“Only by studying hard and conscientiously acquiring a good grasp” of Mr. Xi’s political philosophy, the book said, “can we continuously improve our abilities and better fulfill our responsibilities.”
I can hear dad at the dinner table:

"They're starving in china!"
 

Roberto71

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What is concerning for me, is that China now has a bigger Navy than the US. How the hell has this happened you ask? Each year they are producing more ships, (in peacetime remember), than the US did. between 1941-1945. The US still holds an edge in the quality of ships, the US still has higher tonnage, (more nuclear Subs, Aircraft carriers etc). But that may not last for long.

Analysts are saying that this will turn China into a naval projection country.

This is fairly alarming, China is making clear its intentions with the Spratly islands and I think it's inevitable that China will invade Taiwan. Nothing will stop them on this. The US and others will not launch an all-out war to stop them.
 
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johnlocke

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China All but Ends Hong Kong Democracy With ‘Patriots Only’ Rule​

National assembly backs barring candidates for city’s legislature not endorsed by Beijing​



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Chinese President Xi Jinping pressing a button to join the National People’s Congress’s 2,895-0 vote (with one abstention) to overhaul Hong Kong’s voting system Thursday.​

PHOTO: KEVIN FRAYER/GETTY IMAGES
By
Chun Han Wong
and
Natasha Khan
March 11, 2021 6:37 am


HONG KONG—China drew the curtain on decades of adversarial politics in Hong Kong as the national legislature approved electoral changes that would put pro-Beijing loyalists firmly in charge of the city and squeeze opposition groups from elected office.

Thursday’s near-unanimous vote by the National People’s Congress paves the way for China’s top lawmaking body to revamp as soon as next month how the former British colony picks its leader and legislators. The overhaul will give Beijing much greater control over local elections that were meant to be partly democratic—thanks to an effective veto against candidates deemed unpatriotic.

Chinese officials say the changes are meant to close legal loopholes that had allowed anti-China forces to impede governance and incite unrest in Hong Kong, which was rocked by mass antigovernment protests in 2019.
“The decision is very clear-cut,” Premier Li Keqiang told reporters after the vote. The aim is to uphold the principle of “patriots governing Hong Kong” and improve Beijing’s “one country, two systems” framework for administering the city, he said.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS​

What do you think the future holds for Hong Kong? Join the conversation below.
Opposition groups in Hong Kong say the change is part of Beijing’s broad efforts to wipe out dissent locally, eroding many of the rights and freedoms that residents were promised for the half-century following Britain’s handover of the territory to Chinese rule in 1997.

“It’s the biggest regression of the system since the handover,” said Lo Kin-hei, chairman of Hong Kong’s Democratic Party, who is out on bail after his arrest last year for allegedly participating in an unauthorized assembly in late 2019. “What we’ve seen over the past year is that authorities will do whatever they want, whenever they want, in a way that was unimaginable before.”
The resolution mandates the creation of a commission in Hong Kong that ensures that prospective officeholders conform with criteria laid down in the city’s miniconstitution and national-security legislation.

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‘The decision is very clear-cut,’ Premier Li Keqiang told reporters remotely after the vote.​

PHOTO: MARK SCHIEFELBEIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS

The resolution calls for expanding Hong Kong’s election committee—originally tasked with choosing the city’s chief executive—to 1,500 seats from 1,200, with its membership no longer including district councilors, a voting bloc that would have been dominated by pro-democracy politicians.

More significantly, the committee will be empowered to select a portion of the local legislature—which would expand to 90 seats from 70—and to participate in the nominating process for candidates. A senior Chinese official said last week the committee would directly fill a “relatively large share” of the seats, but the resolution didn’t give a number.

The committee was once tasked with filling a small portion of legislative seats, but this practice stopped after the 2000 legislative election.
Under existing rules, half the legislature is directly elected by the public, and the other half selected by professional and special interest groups.

The resolution didn’t provide further details on the proposed overhaul, or set a timeline. The new rules would be enacted through amendments to so-called annex documents that supplement the miniconstitution. Hong Kong members of the National People’s Congress say the new rules could be completed as soon as April.

“The electoral reform is meant to ensure dissidents cannot get elected to the Legislative Council,” said Steve Tsang, director of the SOAS China Institute in London, who specializes in Hong Kong politics. “This is important because it reverses the direction of political development in Hong Kong set by the British before the end of the colonial era.”

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The National People’s Congress finished its weeklong session Friday.​

PHOTO: ROMAN PILIPEY/POOL/SHUTTERSTOCK

Hong Kong’s government postponed legislative elections scheduled for last September by at least a year, citing the pandemic. The city is set to pick its chief executive next year. The incumbent, Carrie Lam, who has a low public-approval rating, hasn’t said whether she intends to run for a second five-year term.

Beijing has sought to stamp out dissent in Hong Kong since months of antigovernment protests caused citywide chaos in 2019. China’s top legislature imposed a national-security law on the city in June, and authorities have since arrested more than 100 pro-democracy figures, including many opposition groups’ leaders. Authorities have also disqualified pro-democracy politicians from the Hong Kong legislature.

Chinese officials have said they aren’t attempting to curb criticism of the government.
“We are not speaking about creating a monolithic government…we understand that Hong Kong is a plural society with a blend of Chinese and Western culture,” said Song Ru’an, the Chinese Foreign Ministry’s deputy commissioner in the territory, at a Tuesday briefing.

Even so, “when we talk about patriotism, we are not talking about the abstraction of loving a cultural or historical China, but rather loving the currently existing People’s Republic of China under the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party,” Mr. Song said.

The vote on the resolution, coming on the final day of a weeklong session in Beijing of the National People’s Congress, was 2,895 in favor, none against, and one member abstaining.
 
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China’s Crackdown on Hong Kong Tested in Trial of Pro-Democracy Politicians​

The case is seen as a barometer of how officials will use the city’s national-security law against political opponents​



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Lawrence Lau, a Hong Kong lawyer who has been charged under a new national-security law, spoke outside a court in July 2020.​

PHOTO: ISAAC LAWRENCE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
By
Natasha Khan
and
Wenxin Fan
Updated March 4, 2021 1:10 pm ET


HONG KONG—Defense lawyer Lawrence Lau represented the first person charged under a new national-security law—a flag-bearing street protester—in July. This week, he found himself presenting his own defense after being charged under the same legislation.

Mr. Lau was among dozens of pro-democracy politicians accused of subverting the state, the biggest case brought so far amid China’s crackdown on democracy advocates in the city. After a four-day bail hearing ended late Thursday, all of them remained in jail.

Magistrate Victor So, handpicked by the city’s top local official to handle national-security cases, remanded 32 of the 47 defendants in custody without bail, pending trial later this year. Mr. So surprised some observers by agreeing to grant bail to the other 15, including Mr. Lau, but government prosecutors immediately lodged an appeal that prevented them from walking free.
The case has put a spotlight on the long-vaunted independence of the city’s judiciary, which has come under attack from Chinese state media and had its role in state security cases fettered by the law. The case is also widely viewed as a barometer of how far officials are willing to use the national-security law against political opponents as China cracks down on dissent after the biggest protests in half a century, which rocked Hong Kong in 2019.

Pro-democracy activists have cited the case as evidence the national-security law is being used to curtail the city’s pluralistic political system. As the bail hearing dragged on, some of the political groups that the accused were involved with were disbanded, further weakening a fragmented and downtrodden opposition movement.

“This is the biggest political trial in Hong Kong’s history,” said Chow Po-chung, an associate professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong’s department of government and public administration. Targeting the 47 pro-democracy politicians—almost the entire opposition leadership bloc—sent a warning to the Hong Kong people not to oppose the government, he said.
The city’s Department of Justice has said that the decision to prosecute was made without any political considerations.
The mass incarceration of opposition figures removes the bulk of leading faces of dissent from public view as Chinese leaders prepare for the country’s annual legislative meeting starting Friday. Changes to Hong Kong’s electoral system were on the agenda published Thursday.

Mr. Lau, a 53-year-old barrister, represented a generation of pro-democracy campaigners that emerged from the chaos of the social unrest in 2019.

He was elected as a neighborhood representative in a sweep of district council elections by pro-democracy candidates in November 2019, inflicting a heavy defeat on pro-Beijing parties. Social-media posts from the newspaper columnist and book author showed his office piled with books, some on freedom and democracy, along with his cats, Dworkin and Yinke, named after two scholars he admires.

Last July, Mr. Lau was among dozens who took part in unofficial primaries to select the most popular candidates that the pan-democratic camp would put forward as candidates for the city’s legislature. It was part of a strategy to win a majority in Hong Kong’s lawmaking body, known as the Legislative Council.

Police later accused many of those involved of subversion. They cited a goal of organizers to use measures spelled out in Hong Kong’s mini constitution to use the bloc’s power to vote against government proposals and ultimately force the city’s top official to step down. The plan was a plot to paralyze the city’s government, prosecutors allege.
In January, Mr. Lau was among 53 people arrested in dawn raids by police. He was charged last Sunday, before appearing in court Monday in floral shoes and a jacket with a pocket square.




Hong Kong Police Make Mass Arrests of Pro-Democracy Figures

Hong Kong Police Make Mass Arrests of Pro-Democracy Figures

Hong Kong police arrested more than 50 pro-democracy figures for allegedly plotting to destabilize the government. WSJ’s Andrew Dowell reports on how the biggest crackdown since the national-security law was imposed chips away at the city’s rule of law and global status. Photo: AP/TVB (Originally published Jan. 6, 2021)

Families complained that the defendants had no chance to change or wash for the first three days of the hearings. As hearings went on, those charged made emotional appeals for bail.

Crowds began lining up outside the courthouse under gloomy skies and drizzling rain before dawn, expressing solidarity with the accused and at times chanting protest slogans.

Under the new national-security law, the criteria for bail is higher than the norm, meaning anyone charged could spend months in detention before even going to trial: They are due in court again in late May.

Even so, the magistrate ruled in favor of granting bail to 15 of the accused under stringent conditions, including bans on taking part in elections and any communications with foreign politicians or officials. After the Department of Justice said it was appealing the decision, he sent the group back into custody pending a higher court review.
As the defendants left the courtroom, some shouted: “Political prisoners are not guilty! Hong Kongers never die!” Outside, family members and friends cried and screamed, one collapsing outside the rooms where the trial was relayed.
“This is a dark, dark day for the city,” said one supporter, Jane Wong, who is friends with some of the activists. “We won’t forget this.”

Mr. Lau, the lawyer, was prepared. Ahead of reporting to the police station on Sunday, he posted a selfie on Instagram, saying he wanted to say goodbye to his supporters, though he hoped he would see them later.
“From this afternoon, I may not see blue skies again,” Mr. Lau wrote in the post, citing the work of a Turkish journalist who smuggled parts of his memoirs of life in imprisonment on pieces of paper. “I may never see the world again!”
His case will be heard in the next 48 hours.
 
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Neo-cons (and Democrat allies like Richard Haas) continue to misportray China as "communist" and a military threat. Not seeing how America is self-flagellating. Which country is more capitalist? Below, their representative financial-center cities. The city at the top was built mostly since 1900 (120 years), the one at the bottom built since liberalization began in 1978 (42 years). Which nation has grown, which has stagnated? Why? Did any Soviet city ever look like this? Is all China fake, a Potemkin village, as some claim?

1615476478816.png
 
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China Plans to Ask U.S. to Roll Back Trump Policies in Alaska Meeting​

For the first high-level session with Biden’s team, Beijing brings an agenda far apart from Washington’s​



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People familiar with Beijing’s plans said Chinese officials would seek a virtual meeting in April between President Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping, shown in Beijing last week.​

PHOTO: ROMAN PILIPEY/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
By
Lingling Wei
and
Bob Davis
Updated March 17, 2021 5:34 pm ET


Beijing plans to press Washington to reverse many of the policies targeting China introduced during the Trump presidency in the first face-to-face meeting of senior U.S. and China officials since President Biden’s election, according to people with knowledge of the plans.

The meeting in Alaska on Thursday gives both sides a chance to reset the stormy relationship between the world’s two largest economies, which are at loggerheads over technology development, human rights, trade and military leadership in Asia.
U.S. officials say the meeting is a way to present American complaints about Chinese actions, such as its curtailing of freedoms in Hong Kong, naval expansion in the South China Sea, economic pressure on U.S. allies, intellectual-property violations and cybersecurity incursions. The U.S. also plans to sound out Chinese officials about ways the two countries could work together on issues such as climate change and global health.

China comes with a different agenda that has little overlap with Washington’s, a sign of how far apart the two sides are and how difficult it will be to repair the relationship.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS​

How do you envision U.S.-China relations changing under the new administration? Join the conversation below.
Yang Jiechi, a member of the Communist Party ruling body, and Foreign Minister Wang Yi plan to urge Secretary of State Antony Blinken and national security adviser Jake Sullivan to drop sanctions and restrictions on Chinese entities and individuals put in place by the Trump administration, said the people with knowledge of the plans.

The Chinese officials also plan to propose re-establishing regular high-level meetings between the two sides and scheduling a virtual summit between Chinese leader Xi Jinping and Mr. Biden in April during a global conference on climate change. The White House declined to comment on the prospect of such a meeting.

China’s broad agenda reflects a greater confidence by Beijing, which in the past has used high-level meetings mainly to react to U.S. initiatives. “China feels that it has the wind at its back, that the East is rising and the West is fading,” said Daniel Russel, a former Obama State Department official.

The measures China wants reversed include limits on American sales to Chinese firms such as its telecommunications company Huawei Technologies Co. and chip maker Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp. ; visa restrictions on Communist Party members, Chinese students and state-media journalists; and closure of the Chinese Consulate in Houston. Beijing has retaliated in kind, hitting American entities and individuals with similar penalties.

Should those restrictions be removed or relaxed, China would consider eliminating its own countermeasures, said the people with knowledge of the Chinese plans.

Messrs. Yang and Wang plan to propose a new framework for setting up recurring, annual meetings between the two powers to hash out differences in economic, trade, security and other areas. The so-called strategic dialogue format was put in place during the George W. Bush administration and continued through the Obama years, when Messrs. Blinken and Sullivan were top foreign-policy officials.

President Donald Trump abolished the mechanism because his advisers said that China used it to tie up the Americans in endless discussions. The Biden administration has shown no interest so far in re-establishing the talks.
A senior Biden administration official played down expectations that the Alaska meeting would lead to any agreement. The official described it as a one-off meeting that didn’t portend “the resumption of a particular dialogue mechanism or the beginning of a dialogue process.”

Beijing also may not expect any concrete results, said Mr. Russel, the former Obama official, who is now vice president at the Asia Society Policy Institute, a think tank. Rather, the Chinese “will attempt to gain a better understanding of where the Americans are thinking the relationship will go and what might be possible,” he said.

So far, the Biden administration has continued some of Mr. Trump’s policies, including on Tuesday expanding sanctions against Chinese officials who it says have undermined Hong Kong’s autonomy from Beijing.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Commerce Department served subpoenas on multiple Chinese companies as part of the U.S. effort to target technology and services that could threaten national security.

Tariffs the Trump administration imposed on Chinese goods aren’t expected to be high on China’s agenda in Alaska, even though Mr. Wang, the foreign minister, in a February speech called for the removal of trade-related penalties.
China started reaching out to Biden aides late last year, though China’s Foreign Ministry said the suggestion for the Alaska meeting came from Washington. “The U.S. side proposed to hold this high-level strategic dialogue, which we think is meaningful,” the ministry told The Wall Street Journal. It didn’t elaborate further, but said, “We hope that the two sides can have a candid dialogue on issues of mutual concern.”

Chinese officials plan to propose using a virtual climate summit attended by global leaders on April 22, which is Earth Day, to schedule a meeting between Messrs. Xi and Biden, the people with knowledge of Beijing’s plans said. Both sides have indicated that they are willing to work together to fight global warming and other climate-related issues, though the U.S. is wary that China will try to use the climate issue to get the U.S. to back off in other areas.
The two leaders have spoken once since the U.S. presidential election, a session that lasted for two hours, according to Mr. Biden.

Chinese officials indicate that there is no room for compromise on sovereignty issues involving Hong Kong and Taiwan. Mr. Blinken, who will stop in Alaska on his way back from a trip to Japan and South Korea this week, fired salvos at China from Tokyo on Thursday over both issues.

China also plans to propose that both countries create a “vaccine passport” to verify proof of immunization, according to the people familiar with the plans. Chinese officials hope that can help facilitate travel between the two countries.
It could also help China get recognition for its homegrown vaccines. In recent days, some Chinese embassies have said they would facilitate visas for foreigners who have received Chinese vaccines.


U.S. vs China: The Battle for Bitcoin Mining Supremacy

U.S. vs China: The Battle for Bitcoin Mining Supremacy
 
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johnlocke

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2/2


Chinese bitcoin miners have long dominated the global processing power that runs the bitcoin network with sophisticated equipment and access to cheap electricity. But now, a group of U.S. miners with deep pockets wants to conquer a greater share of the industry. Photo: Adam Chapman for The Wall Street Journal

Beijing’s broad agenda for the meeting shows the Chinese leadership’s increasing confidence in the party-state system. China’s economy has withstood a trade war with the Trump administration and has been rebounding strongly, helped by its early headway in reining in coronavirus infections. Mr. Xi, the most forceful Chinese leader in recent decades, is enjoying widespread support among the Chinese public, Chinese officials say.

Still, Beijing is eager to move past the turmoil in the U.S. relationship, which has taken a toll on business and investor confidence in the world’s second-largest economy.

The Biden team also feels that it is in a strong position, having passed a $1.9 trillion economic relief package and having started to work with allies on China and other economic issues, the senior Biden administration official said.
The symbolism of the meeting is important, said the official, who noted the importance of having both the secretary of state and the national security adviser represent the U.S. In the past, China has tried to capitalize on splits among American representatives, the official said.

Having Messrs. Blinken and Sullivan at the session will make clear, the official said, “there is not going to be daylight and that the games that China has played in the past, to divide us, or attempt to divide us, are simply not going to work here.”
The U.S. side plans to address the economic pressure China has placed on Australia by curtailing imports after Canberra called for an independent investigation into the origins of the coronavirus. A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman this week blamed the tension on “Australia’s wrong words and deeds on issues concerning China’s sovereignty, security and development interests.”

The session will help each side better understand the other, said the senior Biden administration official. “It’s about communicating the areas where we intend to take steps, and it’s about understanding where our Chinese interlocutors are at,” the official said.
 

Big/Sky/Fly

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This is one of the better arguments for Trump2020. Name anyone else with his experience in going bankrupt on someone. Seriously though, I think when you owe anyone that much, you are actually in the drivers seat. The only way I see that not holding true would be enter BSF. He/she/they/them could explain it much more in depth than I could. Guessing BSF is a he based on the hot rod thread, but I don't know.
IMA dew...I just read this. :coffee:

China is the NWO model country. They're being propped up (on purpose).
 

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You know that Xi is concerned about this meeting. China Joe may ask him for money out in the open he’s so demented. And then what will happen?

The rest of the world is laughing their asses off and how stupid we, the American people, our for letting this complete abomination and degeneration of our country to actually happen.
 
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Bitter Alaska Meeting Complicates Already Shaky U.S.-China Ties​

A divisive exchange between senior foreign policy officials exposes the deepening distrust between the powers​



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Secretary of State Antony Blinken, left, and national security adviser Jake Sullivan address the media following closed-door talks between the U.S. and China in Anchorage, Alaska, on Friday.​

PHOTO: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
By
William Mauldin
Updated March 19, 2021 6:34 pm ET


ANCHORAGE, Alaska—High-level talks between the Biden administration and Beijing that veered into acrimony put the U.S.-China rivalry in sharp relief, complicating efforts by the two powers to erect guardrails and keep tensions from spiraling further.
The two-day meetings, which ended Friday, covered an array of issues that over the past year sent U.S.-China relations to their most unsteady point in decades: China’s clampdown on Hong Kong, repression of Muslims in Xinjiang and aggressive behavior with its neighbors. The two sides also explored some areas of hoped-for common ground.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken told reporters afterward that the governments “are fundamentally at odds” on issues such as Hong Kong and cyberattacks, though interests intersect on Iran, North Korea, Afghanistan and climate change.
“We were clear-eyed coming in, we’re clear-eyed coming out, and we will go back to Washington to take stock of where we are,” national security adviser Jake Sullivan said.

Yang Jiechi, China’s senior-most foreign-policy official, also noted “important disagreements” remained, and in remarks to Chinese state media suggested Beijing wouldn’t back down. “China will unswervingly defend its national sovereignty, security and development interests. China’s development and strengthening is unstoppable,” said Mr. Yang.

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The Chinese delegation led by top foreign policy officials Yang Jiechi, second from left, and Wang Yi, second from right, leaving the room after the conclusion of talks with U.S. officials on Friday.​

PHOTO: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

The talks were the first under the Biden administration and tested its strategy to compartmentalize the countries’ relationship into what Mr. Blinken said are competitive, collaborative and adversarial components.

To that end, in the week ahead of the talks, the Biden administration rallied support among allies in Asia and imposed sanctions on senior Chinese legislators—moves that in part sparked Beijing’s anger as the talks opened Thursday.

In his opening remarks, Mr. Blinken launched into China’s cyberattacks, its threats against Taiwan and others, and its clampdowns in Xinjiang and Hong Kong as “threatening the rules-based order that maintains global stability.”

Mr. Yang, in turn, criticized the U.S. for undermining global stability by using force around the world, and he said the U.S. doesn’t serve as a model to others. He listed the U.S.’s problems with racism, mentioning the Black Lives Matter movement, and declining domestic confidence in U.S. democracy.

Although U.S. officials played down the public sparring, the divisiveness, on display in front of reporters, exposed a deepening distrust between the two governments that is likely to make cooperation more difficult.

“Anyone who was hoping there would be a significant de-escalation—largely people in the business community—can see that’s not going to be possible, at least in the near term,” said Allison Sherlock, a China analyst at the consultancy Eurasia Group.
On Friday in their last meeting, Messrs. Blinken and Sullivan and Mr. Yang and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi gathered with a smaller group of aides to try to set up a way to manage difficulties ahead, officials said.

Foreign-policy specialists said the acrimony shows shifting perceptions that each has about the balance of power between the two nations, increasing the likelihood of miscalculation and conflicts over hot spots like control of critical technologies and China’s claims against Taiwan and Japan and in the South China Sea.

A new target is the U.S. electric-vehicle maker Tesla Inc. China’s government is restricting use of Tesla vehicles by members of the Chinese military and employees in sensitive posts in government and business, citing national-security concerns over data collected by the cars, according to people familiar with the effort.

Chinese President Xi Jinping is also trying to bolster the Chinese economy, as he prepares for a pivotal period in his control over the Communist Party. He is expected to seek a third term as party leader next year and can ill afford a full-blown crisis with the U.S. in the run-up.

Still, he and other officials have in recent months played up perceptions that “the East is rising and the West is declining,” citing the Communist Party’s perceived superiority in governance.

Mr. Yang, a member of the party’s ruling body, channeled that sentiment in responding to Mr. Blinken on Thursday. “The United States does not have the qualification to say that it wants to speak to China from a position of strength,” Mr. Yang said. He accused the U.S. of being condescending and waved his finger at Mr. Blinken and Mr. Sullivan.

Mr. Yang’s remarks drew plaudits in China, where they were circulated on social and mainstream media.

People’s Daily, the Communist Party’s flagship newspaper, posted a warning to the U.S. on several of its social-media accounts in English and Chinese, to “stop interfering in China’s internal affairs” and, echoing Mr. Yang, said: “The U.S. is not qualified to talk to China in such a condescending way.”

U.S. officials accused Mr. Yang of grandstanding for a domestic audience and said Mr. Blinken and Mr. Sullivan continued to engage their Chinese interlocutors on substance.

“We will still have business to conduct,” Karine Jean-Pierre, the White House’s principal deputy press secretary, told reporters. “America’s approach will be undergirded by confidence in our dealing with Beijing.”
Still, the thrust of Mr. Yang’s remarks presages difficult dealings ahead, said Michael Pillsbury, a China expert at the Hudson Institute, a conservative think tank, who advised the Trump administration on China.
“The tone seems to be different. Now China is not just equal to us, they are superior,” said Mr. Pillsbury. He said the U.S. needs to find more leverage over China.

A key part of the Biden strategy to compete with Beijing—working with U.S. allies—also angers Beijing, which sees the alliances as central to U.S.’s effort to constrain China’s ascent and limit its influence. Beijing has over the past year escalated tensions with U.S. allies such as Japan and Australia and other U.S. partners such as Taiwan and India, whose troops clashed with Chinese forces along their Himalayan border.

“China sees itself in an increasingly hostile global environment,” said Eurasia Group’s Ms. Sherlock. From that perspective, she said, Mr. Yang’s outburst Thursday served to make Beijing’s frustrations public. “It does represent a sharpening attitude for dealing with the U.S.,” she said.
 
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