Election Fraud

foobahl

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Messages
4,168
Reaction score
1,696
Points
113
Location
the only Henniker on earth
Read my post again...you missed something.
If states just all required the real id drivers license or a real id identification card which most people opt for anyway, I don't see a problem. Remember now if you must show a SS card and birth certificate to obtain either of those how will illegals get them? Just the fact you will now need a SS card and BC will prevent illegals from even getting a drivers license. I don't understand why you would opt out of the real id license but seem willing to register with the federal ID. I'm sure you'll need to provide the same proof of citizenship.
Don't see a need for a federal voter ID when I've already proved to my state which I vote in that I am a us citizen and eligible to vote. This idea we need fed voting id's is all just another stroking of the big lie.
I agree with the premise however many states require no ID or no photo ID. You state Real ID would be the way to go, but if no ID is required what good does RealID do for voting? I do not get a real ID because it is not required. I would need a passport to travel out of country anyway, so there is no extra step.

 

Mr NFLfan

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 23, 2003
Messages
4,705
Reaction score
338
Points
83
Age
65
Location
I live where the men are men and the sheep are ner

Are you REAL ID ready?​

On October 1, 2021, U.S. travelers must be REAL ID compliant to board domestic flights and access certain federal facilities.


You've always need a passport on international destinations and that will remain, but come October 1st 2021 you'll need it to fly on domestic flights.
 

Undertaker #59*

Car'a'carn
Staff member
Joined
Oct 8, 2002
Messages
25,647
Reaction score
2,908
Points
113

Are you REAL ID ready?​

On October 1, 2021, U.S. travelers must be REAL ID compliant to board domestic flights and access certain federal facilities.


You've always need a passport on international destinations and that will remain, but come October 1st 2021 you'll need it to fly on domestic flights.
Yup.

I believe this was first scheduled for Oct 1 2020, but was delayed due to covid.

I am a little in the dark with it though. Could someone who doesn't want to get one explain the reasons why and what the issues with it are?
 

Coltsfan2theend

Custom Titles, we don't need no custom titles
Joined
Oct 15, 2009
Messages
9,783
Reaction score
2,331
Points
113
I have had real id for years now (got it when I renewed my license in 2016).
 

foobahl

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Messages
4,168
Reaction score
1,696
Points
113
Location
the only Henniker on earth
Yup.

I believe this was first scheduled for Oct 1 2020, but was delayed due to covid.

I am a little in the dark with it though. Could someone who doesn't want to get one explain the reasons why and what the issues with it are?
I could ask the reverse question, but for me I feel it is just more government intrusion into personal lives. RealID can be used by more than just the government.
Show me one time where the government valued your privacy. Try to open a bank account without a SS number. Better yet have proper ID and try to cash any check over $9,999.99, even a government one without giving a SS number. The SS administration is the only entity that is supposed to use your SSN, but how far has it gone since inception. Government creep is government creep. They are already talking about going straight digital currency. Why? control. RealID is just another component. I know someone who was arrested and was going to be released after booking. She refused to give her SSN, but gave all other information requested and told the police they had no legal right to her SSN. She spent the weekend in jail for her impertinence. NH law does not require RealID, so I will not. If it is a little more inconvenient for me, such is life, we all make decisions. I will keep renewing my passport, and the airlines can take a gander at that. As a matter of fact, the airlines being able to require RealID is kind of like the uses of a SSN. Soon it will be banks, then schools, and soon any entity with a reader has access to the information. I am sure your medical information will be included at some point. And it will continue to grow from there. End rant.
 

johnlocke

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2008
Messages
12,670
Reaction score
4,437
Points
113
Age
48
Location
Salisbury, NH

Undertaker #59*

Car'a'carn
Staff member
Joined
Oct 8, 2002
Messages
25,647
Reaction score
2,908
Points
113
I could ask the reverse question, but for me I feel it is just more government intrusion into personal lives. RealID can be used by more than just the government.
Show me one time where the government valued your privacy. Try to open a bank account without a SS number. Better yet have proper ID and try to cash any check over $9,999.99, even a government one without giving a SS number. The SS administration is the only entity that is supposed to use your SSN, but how far has it gone since inception. Government creep is government creep. They are already talking about going straight digital currency. Why? control. RealID is just another component. I know someone who was arrested and was going to be released after booking. She refused to give her SSN, but gave all other information requested and told the police they had no legal right to her SSN. She spent the weekend in jail for her impertinence. NH law does not require RealID, so I will not. If it is a little more inconvenient for me, such is life, we all make decisions. I will keep renewing my passport, and the airlines can take a gander at that. As a matter of fact, the airlines being able to require RealID is kind of like the uses of a SSN. Soon it will be banks, then schools, and soon any entity with a reader has access to the information. I am sure your medical information will be included at some point. And it will continue to grow from there. End rant.
No. I mean I am ignorant on what the privacy issues are with Real ID. What sets it apart from a regular NH drivers license?
 

deec77

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 8, 2008
Messages
17,173
Reaction score
8,420
Points
113
No. I mean I am ignorant on what the privacy issues are with Real ID. What sets it apart from a regular NH drivers license?
I can tell you in CT we have 2 different driver licenses ones a “federal ID” akin to a passport for US use ie getting on a military base and now traveling via air and water to a US territory or state.

~Dee~
 

Mr NFLfan

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 23, 2003
Messages
4,705
Reaction score
338
Points
83
Age
65
Location
I live where the men are men and the sheep are ner
If you have a SS card, pay income taxes own and register a vehicle, own property, use a cell phone you're already part of a national data base. I just think this is a state issue and simply requiring a real id to register to vote would take care of the vote "integrity". Soon its going to be easier to buy an assault weapon then registering to vote.
 

johnlocke

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2008
Messages
12,670
Reaction score
4,437
Points
113
Age
48
Location
Salisbury, NH

Georgia Mail-In Election Changes Signed Into Law by Governor​

Altered are how people vote absentee and where they can drop off their ballots​



im-315223

The measures signed into law by Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp are expected to face Democratic challenges in court.​

PHOTO: ALYSSA POINTER/ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
By
Cameron McWhirter
Updated March 25, 2021 9:40 pm ET


ATLANTA—Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed into law changes to the state’s election requirements, including altering how people vote absentee and where people can drop off their ballots.

The bill, passed Thursday by both chambers along party lines, is far less extensive than numerous bills that were initially proposed by GOP legislators, following opposition to those measures from Democrats and some major corporations based in the state.

“The facts are this new law will expand voting access in the Peach State,” said Gov. Kemp, a Republican who attacked critics as hyperpartisan.



Both Parties Push for Election Reforms, but With Very Different Goals

Both Parties Push for Election Reforms, but With Very Different Goals

A political battle over voting reform is heating up in Washington and across the country following the changes brought by the pandemic during the 2020 election. WSJ’s Gerald F. Seib explains. Photo illustration: Laura Kammermann
Democrats and Democratic-leaning groups are expected to challenge the new measures in court. Democratic state Rep. Park Cannon was arrested at the State Capitol on Thursday outside Gov. Kemp’s office as she protested that he had signed the bill into the law.

The bill requires absentee voters to request ballots by providing their driver’s license number, the last four digits of their Social Security number or a copy of some other accepted form of identification. They also have to provide this information when they mail in their ballots. Currently people sign an absentee-ballot application and sign the ballot when they mail it in.
The bill also places new limits on how parties and voting groups mail out absentee ballot request forms and limits the number of ballot drop boxes to one per county except for large counties, which can set up one box for every 100,000 registered voters. The drop boxes must be kept in secure voting locations and emptied and processed by election officials every night.
The bill also gives authority to the state to take over county election boards if they are proven to have chronic mismanagement or fraud problems.

When Georgia’s part-time legislature convened in January, GOP lawmakers submitted numerous bills to change election laws. Some proposed changes from getting rid of Sunday voting, when many Black voters cast ballots, to abolishing no-excuse absentee voting, a measure that Republicans pushed to become a law in 2005.

State Rep. Barry Fleming, a Republican who was a key leader of the effort in the House, said the measures were common-sense efforts to assure the public that voting is fair.

GOP state Sen. Larry Walker said the legislation was necessary to ease the concerns of many voters, especially Republicans, who worried that fraud might have taken place this past election season, when absentee voting was much more popular because of the Covid-19 pandemic. No court or legislative body has found evidence of widespread voter fraud.

“Those are the concern my constituents have,” Mr. Walker said. “Whether they are overblown, it’s hard to say.”

The changes follow key election losses by Republicans in the recent election season. In November, President Donald Trump lost the state to Democrat Joe Biden by about 12,000 votes out of five million cast. Mr. Trump was the first Republican presidential candidate to lose the state since 1992. In January, GOP Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler lost to Democrats Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock, respectively. The victories by Messrs. Ossoff and Warnock gave Democrats 50 seats in the Senate, giving the party control of the chamber because Vice President Kamala Harris has the tiebreaking vote.

The losses infuriated many Republican voters and politicians, and then-President Trump repeatedly said, without providing evidence, that voting had been fraudulent. Mr. Trump and his supporters publicly attacked Mr. Kemp and Republican Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger for not working to overturn the results. Mr. Trump also called Mr. Raffensperger and a staffer to try to change the outcome.
im-315222

Stacey Abrams presided in December as Georgia’s electors convened to cast their votes.​

PHOTO: ELIJAH NOUVELAGE/REUTERS

Democrats see the moves as an effort by political losers to change voting rules to make it harder for Democratic-leaning voters, including minorities, to cast ballots.

“There is not a problem they are trying to fix,” said Democratic state Sen. Jen Jordan. “If there is not a problem they have to fix, you have to ask why are they doing it?”

Lauren Groh-Wargo, chief executive of Fair Fight Action, the voting-advocacy group founded by Stacey Abrams, who was the 2018 Democratic candidate for governor, said, “The full-throated voter-suppression apparatus is getting into full swing” in part because minority voters played a key role in recent Democratic election wins.

Barriers created by the GOP changes won’t stop the voting shift under way favoring Democrats in Georgia, which has been a GOP-dominated state since the early 2000s, according to Ms. Groh-Wargo.

The battle in Georgia comes as Republicans in states around the U.S. push measures that would create new voting restrictions following the 2020 election. President Biden called the push “sick” during a news conference Thursday, while speaking about the broader issue.

“What I’m worried about is how un-American this whole initiative is,” Mr. Biden said, responding to a question about whether he was worried GOP-backed voting changes could cost Democrats control of Congress in 2022.

Democrats have passed a national bill over Republican opposition in the U.S. House that would require states to offer mail-in and early voting among other measures, but it faces steep odds in the 50-50 Senate.
 
OP
Inspector_50

Inspector_50

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 30, 2020
Messages
4,565
Reaction score
851
Points
113
Location
California

Georgia Mail-In Election Changes Signed Into Law by Governor​

Altered are how people vote absentee and where they can drop off their ballots​



im-315223

The measures signed into law by Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp are expected to face Democratic challenges in court.​

PHOTO: ALYSSA POINTER/ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
By
Cameron McWhirter
Updated March 25, 2021 9:40 pm ET


ATLANTA—Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed into law changes to the state’s election requirements, including altering how people vote absentee and where people can drop off their ballots.

The bill, passed Thursday by both chambers along party lines, is far less extensive than numerous bills that were initially proposed by GOP legislators, following opposition to those measures from Democrats and some major corporations based in the state.

“The facts are this new law will expand voting access in the Peach State,” said Gov. Kemp, a Republican who attacked critics as hyperpartisan.



Both Parties Push for Election Reforms, but With Very Different Goals

Both Parties Push for Election Reforms, but With Very Different Goals

A political battle over voting reform is heating up in Washington and across the country following the changes brought by the pandemic during the 2020 election. WSJ’s Gerald F. Seib explains. Photo illustration: Laura Kammermann
Democrats and Democratic-leaning groups are expected to challenge the new measures in court. Democratic state Rep. Park Cannon was arrested at the State Capitol on Thursday outside Gov. Kemp’s office as she protested that he had signed the bill into the law.

The bill requires absentee voters to request ballots by providing their driver’s license number, the last four digits of their Social Security number or a copy of some other accepted form of identification. They also have to provide this information when they mail in their ballots. Currently people sign an absentee-ballot application and sign the ballot when they mail it in.
The bill also places new limits on how parties and voting groups mail out absentee ballot request forms and limits the number of ballot drop boxes to one per county except for large counties, which can set up one box for every 100,000 registered voters. The drop boxes must be kept in secure voting locations and emptied and processed by election officials every night.
The bill also gives authority to the state to take over county election boards if they are proven to have chronic mismanagement or fraud problems.

When Georgia’s part-time legislature convened in January, GOP lawmakers submitted numerous bills to change election laws. Some proposed changes from getting rid of Sunday voting, when many Black voters cast ballots, to abolishing no-excuse absentee voting, a measure that Republicans pushed to become a law in 2005.

State Rep. Barry Fleming, a Republican who was a key leader of the effort in the House, said the measures were common-sense efforts to assure the public that voting is fair.

GOP state Sen. Larry Walker said the legislation was necessary to ease the concerns of many voters, especially Republicans, who worried that fraud might have taken place this past election season, when absentee voting was much more popular because of the Covid-19 pandemic. No court or legislative body has found evidence of widespread voter fraud.

“Those are the concern my constituents have,” Mr. Walker said. “Whether they are overblown, it’s hard to say.”

The changes follow key election losses by Republicans in the recent election season. In November, President Donald Trump lost the state to Democrat Joe Biden by about 12,000 votes out of five million cast. Mr. Trump was the first Republican presidential candidate to lose the state since 1992. In January, GOP Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler lost to Democrats Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock, respectively. The victories by Messrs. Ossoff and Warnock gave Democrats 50 seats in the Senate, giving the party control of the chamber because Vice President Kamala Harris has the tiebreaking vote.

The losses infuriated many Republican voters and politicians, and then-President Trump repeatedly said, without providing evidence, that voting had been fraudulent. Mr. Trump and his supporters publicly attacked Mr. Kemp and Republican Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger for not working to overturn the results. Mr. Trump also called Mr. Raffensperger and a staffer to try to change the outcome.
im-315222

Stacey Abrams presided in December as Georgia’s electors convened to cast their votes.​

PHOTO: ELIJAH NOUVELAGE/REUTERS

Democrats see the moves as an effort by political losers to change voting rules to make it harder for Democratic-leaning voters, including minorities, to cast ballots.

“There is not a problem they are trying to fix,” said Democratic state Sen. Jen Jordan. “If there is not a problem they have to fix, you have to ask why are they doing it?”

Lauren Groh-Wargo, chief executive of Fair Fight Action, the voting-advocacy group founded by Stacey Abrams, who was the 2018 Democratic candidate for governor, said, “The full-throated voter-suppression apparatus is getting into full swing” in part because minority voters played a key role in recent Democratic election wins.

Barriers created by the GOP changes won’t stop the voting shift under way favoring Democrats in Georgia, which has been a GOP-dominated state since the early 2000s, according to Ms. Groh-Wargo.

The battle in Georgia comes as Republicans in states around the U.S. push measures that would create new voting restrictions following the 2020 election. President Biden called the push “sick” during a news conference Thursday, while speaking about the broader issue.

“What I’m worried about is how un-American this whole initiative is,” Mr. Biden said, responding to a question about whether he was worried GOP-backed voting changes could cost Democrats control of Congress in 2022.

Democrats have passed a national bill over Republican opposition in the U.S. House that would require states to offer mail-in and early voting among other measures, but it faces steep odds in the 50-50 Senate.
Now the next election something will cause this to hurt the GOP and they will scream, Dems rigged the election like....well last time when the GOP voted in something they later blamed on the Dems.
 

johnlocke

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2008
Messages
12,670
Reaction score
4,437
Points
113
Age
48
Location
Salisbury, NH

LOL at this part:

Cannon is 5 foot 2, according to her arrest record. Her arrest by several larger, white law enforcement officers and the image of her being brought through the Capitol prompted widespread condemnation on social media overnight. And her arrest prompted comparisons to civil rights and police brutality protests from this summer as well as those of the 1960s.
 

foobahl

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Messages
4,168
Reaction score
1,696
Points
113
Location
the only Henniker on earth

LOL at this part:

Cannon is 5 foot 2, according to her arrest record. Her arrest by several larger, white law enforcement officers and the image of her being brought through the Capitol prompted widespread condemnation on social media overnight. And her arrest prompted comparisons to civil rights and police brutality protests from this summer as well as those of the 1960s.
I thought is was an insurrection in Ga.
 

johnlocke

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2008
Messages
12,670
Reaction score
4,437
Points
113
Age
48
Location
Salisbury, NH

H.R.1 Is Democrats’ Survival Strategy for 2022​

The proposed law would drown our political system in cheating allegations that can’t be disproved.​




By
Holman W. Jenkins, Jr.
March 26, 2021 5:53 pm ET

im-317229

Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks to the press about H.R.1 in Washington, March 3.​

PHOTO: ROD LAMKEY - CNP/ZUMA PRESS


Donald Trump and Stacey Abrams advocate different election reforms and might as well be the same person, both having discovered the personal benefit of alleging their respective elections were stolen from them. Under the Democratic bill H.R.1, expect a lot more Donald Trumps and Stacey Abramses.
Some say we should calm down about the proposed sweeping changes because academic research shows that electoral tweaks, in the end, don’t confer lasting partisan advantage. This misses a key wrinkle. In a duopoly market, the parties (which are basically marketing organizations) indeed will always tend to gravitate to messages and strategies that divide the electorate down the middle. And big data is apparently making them better at it. The real problem with H.R.1 begins exactly here: Its greater incentive for partisans to allege cheating and refuse to honor outcomes when races are close and even when they aren’t.


Mr. Trump, in his Feb. 28 CPAC speech, presented a vision of voting in which most votes are cast in person on Election Day. Guess what, this served as our least-bad solution for two centuries. In-person voting is good for two things. It makes it possible for independent monitors physically to observe who votes. It makes it possible for them to observe how ballots are handled and stored.
The flaw in mass mail-in voting, which Democrats would make universal, is that nothing is observable except the counting. You can’t see who votes; you can’t see how ballots are collected, transported or stored. Every election in the future, in effect, would be decided by mail-in ballots opaquely delivered to the counting table. Never again might a candidate see a personal upside to conceding that a close defeat was fairly arrived at.

Democrats insist with great simplemindedness that making voting easier is, ipso facto, good. They are partly right: Confidence depends on the vote seeming truly representative. Under any rule tweak, though, research has shown, the nonvoting public and the voting public don’t differ much except in affluence. And no matter how easy we make voting, participation will go down and not up if outcomes are constantly roiled by accusations of cheating.
The problem is intrinsically bound up in a secret ballot. Under any election with a secret ballot, the public can’t really be categorically certain the reported results reflect the votes actually cast. At least when margins of victory and defeat are large, they coincide with incidental indicators such as polling. But we’ve seen what happens when elections are so close that they defeat our ability to define and count “legal” votes with precision, and when it becomes impossible to say this or that rule change didn’t determine the outcome.

Of course, one cannot breathe a syllable of criticism of H.R.1 without being called a racist. There’s a reason con men favor turned-around collars and patriotism is the refuge of scoundrels. Antiracism is the new incontestable virtue that every kind of bad faith and self-interest hides behind. Our founders may have been deists but they had a Calvinist’s low opinion of human nature. In giving us a single Election Day where the ballot is secret and yet cast in public view, they gave us a system that could withstand an unrelenting partisan incentive to discredit inconvenient outcomes.

And don’t tell me about Europe: Multiparty systems that depend on coalitions produce very different incentives for cheating and for lofting allegations of cheating. Their problems are different from ours. Much would become possible, however, if we relaxed ballot secrecy. Suppose a unique numerical receipt were issued to each voter, making it easy to confirm against a published list that his or her vote was credited to the correct candidate. This would go a long way to solving the confidence issue to permit mail or online voting.
But a new risk arises: Anybody who potentially had access to your unique receipt could claim to know how you voted. In our social-media age, with its psychopathic desire to call everybody a racist, with its sick craving to deprive people of their jobs and livelihoods because of their political views, even this small weakening of ballot secrecy might usher in a new moral disaster that undermines faith in our democracy.

By the way, you are asleep if you don’t see the tactical expediency behind H.R.1, from the Marc Elias school at the Democratic National Committee, which gave us the Steele dossier and so many last-minute changes to election rules at the state level in 2020.
It may be a Hail Mary but H.R.1 is the Democrats’ hope that they can upend the filibuster, impose a left-wing agenda that voters never sought, and still somehow minimize the effects of a voter backlash in the midterm congressional elections that are less than 20 months away.
One rock-solid prediction: If H.R.1 fails and Democrats lose Congress, a highly-organized media campaign will insist Republican “voter suppression” was the reason.
 

Coltsfan2theend

Custom Titles, we don't need no custom titles
Joined
Oct 15, 2009
Messages
9,783
Reaction score
2,331
Points
113
Also to cash checks or do bank transactions require id. If voter id is voter suppression, how do those it affects do daily tasks??
 
Top