Goodell in trouble now…

Roberto71

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Even more trouble over the Dan Snyder case. It now turns out that Snyder legal team tried to further silence the woman who accused him of assault by sending lawyers after Beth Wilkinson the investigative reporter, threatening her and ordering her to destroy any documents relating to this. They hired private detectives, the works. The accused woman was paid off by Snyder to the tune of $1.6M years ago.

Goodell now being asked why the investigation has been kept quiet?? He won’t release any findings produced by Wilkinson.

This whole thing stinks to hight heaven. Gruden and Bruce Allen were the fall guys to protect Snyder. Gruden can surely sue for 10s of millions here.

 

TyLawsPick6

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That link won't load for me, but I do hope this brings some embarrassment and maybe a removal of that piece of human excrement from the NFL, as much as it would hopefully get shitty Snyder to sell. What I find odd is how the NFL got rid of Richardson, but wanted so badly to protect Snyder.

What does Snyder have on Goodell? The Skins have lost share in recent years, too. They used to be 3rd behind us in annual revenue with Dallas traditionally #1, but Washington has sunk to like 8th or something in recent years.

You think other owners would force him to sell and get out like they did with Richardson. So, what is it? That's my question. Why does Goodell frame us and then why does no one say anything when he gets caught bending over backwards for really bad people and organizations.

It's like a bizarro world of business activity especially for someone like Goodell who is so concerned about image, or least says he is.
 
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Roberto71

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This might be a bit tldr, but here's the first part of the article.

By Will Hobson and
Liz Clarke

Today at 1:57 p.m. EST


In July 2020, just a few days after prominent D.C. attorney Beth Wilkinson began investigating allegations of widespread sexual harassment in the Washington Football Team workplace, she learned of a decade-old allegation of sexual misconduct against team owner Daniel Snyder.
Snyder had for years privately denied the woman’s claims. But the existence of an allegation against him, which had been kept secret by a confidential $1.6 million settlement, had the potential to rock a franchise already reeling from scandal. A few weeks later, Wilkinson sought to interview the former team employee who had made the accusation, according to people familiar with the investigation.


Then Snyder and his team stepped in.
Despite the owner’s public pledge to cooperate “with all aspects of the investigation,” his attorneys attempted to prevent Wilkinson from speaking to Snyder’s accuser, according to a letter the woman’s attorney wrote to Snyder’s lawyers that was filed in federal court.
The Washington Post has not reviewed this letter, which was filed under seal as part of a legal dispute between Wilkinson and a former lawyer for the team. The letter was described by people with knowledge of its contents.
According to these people, the woman’s lawyer, Brendan Sullivan, accused Snyder’s lawyers of offering his client more money beyond the $1.6 million the team paid in 2009, if she agreed not to speak to anyone about her allegations against Snyder and her settlement with the team. In court filings, Wilkinson later described phone calls to Sullivan from Snyder’s lawyers as an attempt to “silence” the 2009 accuser. Wilkinson and Sullivan declined to comment.

Snyder’s attorneys, in their own sealed letter filed in court, denied trying to block the interview and offering the woman more money, according to people familiar with that letter.
Snyder declined an interview request. Lawyers representing Snyder and the team declined interview requests and refused to comment on the record in response to an email outlining the contents of this story.
Daniel Snyder pushed back as the NFL probed. Here are takeaways from The Post’s reporting.
The alleged effort to block the interview is one of several instances in which lawyers and private investigators working on Snyder’s behalf took steps that potential witnesses for Wilkinson viewed as attempts to interfere with the NFL’s investigation, according to a review of hundreds of pages of court records and interviews with more than 30 people, including current and former team and league officials.
While Snyder publicly expressed shock over allegations raised in The Post story that prompted Wilkinson’s investigation, his lawyers filed petitions in federal court seeking, in part, to identify former employees who had spoken to The Post — an effort one federal judge suggested was intended “to burden and harass” former employees who had spoken to reporters.


Private investigators working on Snyder’s behalf, meanwhile, showed up uninvited at the homes of several former employees or contacted their friends and relatives, according to these former employees or their attorneys — acts many of them viewed as intimidation aimed at discouraging former employees from participating in the NFL’s investigation.
And after Snyder’s lawyers learned that the 2009 accuser still intended to speak to Wilkinson — despite what her attorney alleged was an effort to prevent her from speaking to the NFL’s investigator — they provided support for a lawsuit filed against Wilkinson by the team’s retired former general counsel, court records show. That lawsuit sought to bar Wilkinson from discussing the 2009 allegation against Snyder with NFL officials, and to force her to destroy documents relating to the woman’s allegations.
Wilkinson ultimately did interview Snyder’s accuser, according to court records. But the revelation that Snyder was accused of trying to block a witness from participating in the NFL’s investigation raises new concerns about Commissioner Roger Goodell’s decision to keep confidential any report or investigative findings produced by Wilkinson — a departure from how the league has handled investigations in recent years.
More than a dozen women allege sexual harassment and verbal abuse by former team employees at Redskins Park
Previous NFL probes — into the Ray Rice domestic violence case and the “Deflategate” controversy — resulted in detailed, public reports. A league-sponsored investigation of Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson, which substantiated allegations that he had harassed women on the team’s staff and used a racial slur, resulted in the release of executive findings.
Goodell’s secretive handling of the Washington investigation, which has spared Snyder from any public punishment, has drawn recent interest from members of Congress, thanks to a series of leaked emails that prompted the resignation of Las Vegas Raiders coach Jon Gruden and tarnished the reputations of others. The leaks of certain emails produced as part of Wilkinson’s investigation — months after the probe ended — has fueled speculation over their source, with the NFL and Snyder denying any role.
 

Hawg73

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I tend to like the Washington Post, because they typically provide detail and depth, but I got about 3/4ths through that piece and got frustrated with all the lawyerin' and so
forth. Essentially, a rich asshole tried to get off with a girl from the office while she was trapped on a plane with him, paid a stack of money to hush it up and obtain an NDA and now it's all asses and elbows again.

Is no NDA sacred anymore? What's wrong with people?

I know a girl from work that endured the same thing at an phone company event and all she got out of the deal was her drunken bosses puke on her shoes. 1.6 million (or $110,000 after lawyer fees) would buy a lot of shoes and a Land Rover. Seems fair enough to me. :shrug-n:
 

BostonTim

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I tend to like the Washington Post, because they typically provide detail and depth, but I got about 3/4ths through that piece and got frustrated with all the lawyerin' and so
forth. Essentially, a rich asshole tried to get off with a girl from the office while she was trapped on a plane with him, paid a stack of money to hush it up and obtain an NDA and now it's all asses and elbows again.

Is no NDA sacred anymore? What's wrong with people?

I know a girl from work that endured the same thing at an phone company event and all she got out of the deal was her drunken bosses puke on her shoes. 1.6 million (or $110,000 after lawyer fees) would buy a lot of shoes and a Land Rover. Seems fair enough to me. :shrug-n:
 

chevss454

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Am I reading that right? Wilkinson may be the source of the leaked Gruden emails?
 

TyLawsPick6

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Thanks for posting that.

What sports league honestly behaves like this? Remember the goons Goodell sent into Guyer in December of 2015 in the black trench coats? How does the media not report on this stuff on a larger scale?

Isn't the story really Goodell?
 

TyLawsPick6

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Am I reading that right? Wilkinson may be the source of the leaked Gruden emails?
I think so, yes. It would sort of make sense if she was stonewalled. It's pretty damn juicy, though, isn't it? She discovered emails about Gruden was disgusted and used those leaks to maybe threaten Goodell to change course.

I wouldn't be shocked if she told Goodell to fire Gruden or she would leak it. They didn't, the season started, and then, whamo, Gruden is forced to resign.

Regardless, it's awesome this is happening. One of the topics the committee is looking at is "fairness" and if teams are treated equally. Umm, I think anyone with a half of brain knows the answer to that one. This is nothing ethical or fair about how Goodell goes about maneuvering to basically find ways to keep collecting 40 million per year.

That's why I mentioned the Richardson thing in Carolina and that and the protections Snyder is getting. It'd be great to see this bring down Goodell once and for all unable to hide behind his scumbag lawyers at 345 Park Ave. Why would you bend over backwards to protect Baltimore and Ray Rice and Snyder now? Because he likes to golf with Bisciotti at Augusta? It's really worth that much AND the idea even if you did the right thing on Ray Rice, Bisciotti would use it against you somehow?

I've said it for years, but once they testified and won on the backs of "Article 46" during Framegate 2 and the 2 crooked judges said Goodell could break US laws if he wanted, it just gave them more confidence to use that in other areas, like this.

I knew we'd be seeing other egregious cheating measures from Goodell.
 

chevss454

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I'm no lawyer but I don't see anything Goodell did as being illegal. Keeping NFL business a secret doesn't seem to be unlawful to me.
 

Giant Octopodes

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Covering up crimes isn't illegal?
Correct it is not. Destruction of certain materials could be, failing to cooperate with law enforcement typically is, but you have zero legal obligation to cooperate with an investigative reporter. Right to privacy plus 5th amendment means it’s up to others to prove a crime was committed and you were responsible, not on you to help them figure it out.

You could argue conspiracy or harassment, but the former requires an illegal act you’re conspiring over, and the latter would typically lead to civil court not criminal. In their Case if they settled already then that’s kinda null and void. I’m no lawyer of course so don’t construe any of that as legal advice or definitive but that’s my understanding of things.
 

TyLawsPick6

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Correct it is not. Destruction of certain materials could be, failing to cooperate with law enforcement typically is, but you have zero legal obligation to cooperate with an investigative reporter. Right to privacy plus 5th amendment means it’s up to others to prove a crime was committed and you were responsible, not on you to help them figure it out.

You could argue conspiracy or harassment, but the former requires an illegal act you’re conspiring over, and the latter would typically lead to civil court not criminal. In their Case if they settled already then that’s kinda null and void. I’m no lawyer of course so don’t construe any of that as legal advice or definitive but that’s my understanding of things.
This is a man who has been in 3 different federal courts who has been called a liar by 3 different judges (Doty, Jones and Berman). I am not saying this is on the same plane as murder, rape, etc, but consumer fraud is consumer fraud and that's illegal.

God only knows what is on those emails is my point. I would bet a lot of money there is a lot of criminal activity on those emails and we just don't know what they are.

He's cheated in games, been caught changing rules after games to match a call on the field, stolen money from our franchise with framejobs, and be CAUGHT doing it, and on and on and on. There's plenty of stuff on the surface.
 

TyLawsPick6

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Goodell now taking heat from the union for stupidly not doing daily tests for all especially after knowledge of Rodgers and Antonio Brown cheating by lying about their status:

 
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Roberto71

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Roger is now doubling down on his support for Snyder. Bizarre stuff and you wonder does Snyder have something on Goodell or the league?

He’s saying there has been no interference from Snyder at all in the investigations.

 

TyLawsPick6

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Roger is now doubling down on his support for Snyder. Bizarre stuff and you wonder does Snyder have something on Goodell or the league?

He’s saying there has been no interference from Snyder at all in the investigations.

I think it's funny the media won't ask what Snyder has on Goodell. They have all these opportunities to ask him relevant questions and no one asks the pertinent questions. I bet these owners have all kinds of back room deals with Goodell, whether they be investments or partnerships or whatever, which would explain why Goodell is eager to frame and cheat our team, while strangely bending over backwards to protect certain other teams.
 
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