Legal and Illegal Immigration

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johnlocke

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tehmackdaddy

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He doesn't seem to get the causal connection between his policies and this crisis.

They aren't his policies.

The man should be in a nursing home. He can't even speak without sounding drunk or mentally devoid or displaying dementia.

WE ALL KNOW THIS.

Holy guacamole!

Sweet beans of mercy!

(I noticed PFL stopped posting and responding. She's not a fan of logic and reason, so I understand why she left again.)

This is my shocked face. :coffee:
 
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johnlocke

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It's 2 am and I was just reminiscing about my days as a businessman. What I was thinking about was the notion that the only reason most immigrants want to come here so badly is for the public assistance. While there are those and they pretty much suck and you spot them in the different parts of cities, my experience hiring foreigners was actually eye-opening and fantastic.

I had men from Columbia, Puerto Rico, Cape Verdi, Dominican, Hati, Poland, and Mexico over the years.

What struck me and never failed to impress me was the level of hustle these guys had. Some had good skills too but they all busted their asses. Made the American guys look slow and lazy. The American guys still were good but not willing to run around like these foreigners.

I suspect but don't know that few of the day laborers were illegal. Excellent workers, the lot of em. Many had 2 and 3 jobs.

My Polish friend who worked for me for 20 years is fascinating. He had a college degree in painting that he had received in Poland, wow. The most epically skilled and detailed painter I've had. He was chased out of Poland for working with Lech Walesa in the underground press fighting the communists, a fascinating story. They came here with 6 other guys and women and share a 1 bedroom apartment, ate virtually nothing but bologna sandwiches for 2 years, and built up nice little bank accounts then bought houses. Good shit, that's how ya do it. They knew nobody in the states and no one sponsored them and NO public assistance. They would have been mortified to do such a thing.

Long story short, in my experience in the construction world, these cats can rock it.

Not to mention higher-end professionals etc coming and that adds up to increase of brains and brawn, skill and innovation in America. Win/win.

This is precisely the manner both sides of my family came here at the turn of the last century.

Fix the restrictive immigration system. It is eminently broken. We need more of these people not fewer.
 
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patsRmyboys

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Fixed the restrictive immigration system. It is eminently broken. We need more of these people not fewer.
That's it in a nutshell. Lefties think we don't want immigrants to come here. Even though wrong is an absolute state and not subject to gradation (credit Sheldon Cooper) they couldn't be MORE wrong. We want them to come... LEGALLY
 
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shecolt

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As I read this article about a Texas hospital that says they are owed more than $200,000 for the care they gave to migrant minors, two things stuck out to me.

The first was that four of those patients had attempted suicide. Extremely sad, but also not surprising as they often go through hell to get here and then find themselves trying to deal with being separated from the friends and loved ones who are no longer in their lives.

The second was that members of the local community have wanted to provide supplies, new clothing, and shoes. But, the HHS won't let the donations come through. Now, that does surprise me. I can understand why they wouldn't want everyone bringing their own donations to the facility. But, I don't understand why donations couldn't be collected and then given to the facility. Does anyone know why this isn't acceptable to the HHS?

 
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johnlocke

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Supreme Court Rules Against Immigrants Seeking Green Cards​


By Adam Liptak1h

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday that immigrants allowed to stay in the United States temporarily for humanitarian reasons may not apply for green cards if they had entered the country unlawfully.
The case, Sanchez v. Mayorkas, No. 20-315, could affect tens of thousands of immigrants. It was brought by Jose Sanchez and Sonia Gonzalez, natives of El Salvador who entered the United States unlawfully in the late 1990s.
In 2001, after earthquakes devastated El Salvador, the United States made that country’s nationals eligible for the “temporary protected status” program. The program shields immigrants from parts of the world undergoing armed conflicts and natural disasters from deportation and allows them to work in the United States.
Sanchez and Gonzalez, a married couple, were granted protection under the program. In 2014, they applied for lawful permanent residency, commonly known as a green card. After their application was denied, they sued.

The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in Philadelphia, ruled against them, saying they were ineligible under a part of the immigration laws that requires applicants to have been “inspected and admitted” into the United States.
Temporary protected status, Judge Thomas M. Hardiman wrote for the unanimous three-judge panel, “does not constitute an admission.”
“As its name suggests,” he wrote, “this protection is meant to be temporary.”
Justice Elena Kagan, writing for the Supreme Court on Monday, agreed, saying that two parts of the immigration laws operate on separate tracks. One part allows some people who have entered the country lawfully to apply for green cards.
That first part “imposes an admission requirement twice over,” she wrote. It says that applicants for green cards must have been “inspected and admitted or paroled into the United States.” And it adds that people who had worked in the United States without authorization, as Sanchez had before he was granted temporary protected status, are eligible only if their presence in the United States was “pursuant to a lawful admission.”

The other relevant part of the immigration laws, Kagan wrote, allows immigrants, whether they entered the country lawfully or not, to apply for temporary protected status, or TPS.
“The government may designate a country for the program when it is beset by especially bad or dangerous conditions, such as arise from natural disasters or armed conflicts,” she wrote. “The country’s citizens, if already present in the United States, may then obtain TPS. That status protects them from removal and authorizes them to work here for as long as the TPS designation lasts.”
The two tracks can sometimes merge, Kagan wrote, if the recipient of temporary protected status had entered the country lawfully. But she added that people who entered without authorization do not become eligible for green cards thanks to temporary protected status.

“Lawful status and admission, as the court below recognized,” she wrote, “are distinct concepts in immigration law: Establishing one does not necessarily establish the other.”
“On the one hand, a foreign national can be admitted but not in lawful status — think of someone who legally entered the United States on a student visa, but stayed in the country long past graduation,” Kagan wrote. “On the other hand, a foreign national can be in lawful status but not admitted — think of someone who entered the country unlawfully, but then received asylum. The latter is the situation Sanchez is in, except that he received a different kind of lawful status.”
“Because a grant of TPS does not come with a ticket of admission,” she wrote, “it does not eliminate the disqualifying effect of an unlawful entry.”

This article originally appeared in The New York Times .
For more stories, subscribe to The New York Times.
(c) 2021 The New York Times Company.
 

shecolt

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lol at the cardboard cutout

And, some words of advice for Kamala:

Girl, you need to stick to your "covid concerns" excuse for not visiting the border. When your reply is to say that you haven't been to Europe either and then follow that up with laughter, it may give some the impression that you don't give a damn.

 

aloyouis

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lol at the cardboard cutout

And, some words of advice for Kamala:

Girl, you need to stick to your "covid concerns" excuse for not visiting the border. When your reply is to say that you haven't been to Europe either and then follow that up with laughter, it may give some the impression that you don't give a damn.

Welp, that is because she doesn't.
 
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