Privacy Issues - Are you paying attention?

johnlocke

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My friend's kid has a Google something or other and it's cool for the kids and fun but hun, you guys sell weed, you want Google listening in a state where it's decriminalized but still illegal? She is so smart on so much, I don't get this one.
 
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aloyouis

aloyouis

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Ordering a Pizza in 2022
CALLER: Is this Pizza Hut?
GOOGLE: No sir, it's Google Pizza.
CALLER: I must have dialed a wrong number, sorry.
GOOGLE: No sir, Google bought Pizza Hut last month.
CALLER: OK. I would like to order a pizza.
GOOGLE: Do you want your usual, sir?
CALLER: My usual? You know me?
GOOGLE: According to our caller ID data sheet, the last 12 times you called you ordered an extra-large pizza with three cheeses, sausage, pepperoni, mushrooms and meatballs on a thick crust.
CALLER: Super! That’s what I’ll have.
GOOGLE: May I suggest that this time you order a pizza with ricotta, arugula, sun-dried tomatoes and olives on a whole wheat gluten-free thin crust?
CALLER: What? I don’t want a vegetarian pizza!
GOOGLE: Your cholesterol is not good, sir.
CALLER: How in the world do you know that?
GOOGLE: Well, we cross-referenced your home phone number with your medical records. We have the result of your blood tests for the last 7 years.
CALLER: Okay, but I do not want your rotten vegetarian pizza! I already take medication for my cholesterol.
GOOGLE: Excuse me sir, but you have not taken your medication regularly. According to our database, you purchased only a box of 30 cholesterol tablets once at Lloyds Pharmacy, 4 months ago.
CALLER: I bought more from another Pharmacy.
GOOGLE: That doesn’t show on your credit card statement.
CALLER: I paid in cash.
GOOGLE: But you did not withdraw enough cash according to your bank statement.
CALLER: I have other sources of cash.
GOOGLE: That doesn’t show on your latest tax returns, unless you bought them using an undeclared income source, which is against the law!
CALLER: WHAT THE HECK?
GOOGLE: I'm sorry sir, we use such information only with the sole intention of helping you.
CALLER: Enough already! I'm sick of Google, Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp and all the others. I'm going to an island without the internet, TV, where there is no phone service and no one to watch me or spy on me.
GOOGLE: I understand sir, but you need to renew your passport first. It expired 6 weeks ago...
Welcome to the future...
(Copy and paste, just like I did).









Actually, that isn't funny nor an exaggeration.
 
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aloyouis

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It is kinda fun to watch FB writhe. I can only imagine their anger and diatribulations in their internal meetings over this. HOW DARE anyone or anything get in the way of knowing every damn thing they need to MAKE MONEY.

And the sheep that follow simply can't understand that FB is using them...
 

johnlocke

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I run VPNs on our phones and my PC, serious firewalls, and anti-browser following programs. Good luck with following me.


T-Mobile to Step Up Ad Targeting of Cellphone Customers​

Wireless carrier tells subscribers it could share their masked browsing, app data and online activity with advertisers unless they opt out​



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T-Mobile ended 2020 with more than 60 million phone users under its main brand and more than 20 million customers on prepaid plans.​

PHOTO: RICHARD B. LEVINE/ZUMA PRESS
By
Drew FitzGerald
March 9, 2021 5:30 am ET

  • AIL

T-Mobile to Step Up Ad Targeting of Cellphone Customers​

Wireless carrier tells subscribers it could share their masked browsing, app data and online activity with advertisers unless they opt out​



im-308657

T-Mobile ended 2020 with more than 60 million phone users under its main brand and more than 20 million customers on prepaid plans.​

PHOTO: RICHARD B. LEVINE/ZUMA PRESS
By
Drew FitzGerald
March 9, 2021 5:30 am ET

T-Mobile US Inc. TMUS 1.91% will automatically enroll its phone subscribers in an advertising program informed by their online activity, testing businesses’ appetite for information that other companies have restricted.

The No. 2 U.S. carrier by subscribers said in a recent privacy-policy update that unless they opt out it will share customers’ web and mobile-app data with advertisers starting April 26. For example, the program could help advertisers identify people who enjoy cooking or are sports enthusiasts, the company said.

T-Mobile’s TMUS 1.91% new policy will also cover Sprint customers acquired through the carriers’ 2020 merger. Sprint had previously shared similar data only from customers who opted into its third-party ad program.

A T-Mobile spokeswoman said the changes give subscribers advertising that aligns with their interests. “We’ve heard many say they prefer more relevant ads so we’re defaulting to this setting,” she said. (See below how to change your account settings.)

T-Mobile ended 2020 with more than 60 million phone users under its main brand and more than 20 million customers on prepaid plans. The company said the changes wouldn’t apply to business accounts or children’s lines.
Many big tech companies are under pressure from regulators and privacy advocates to move in the opposite direction on user data. Google owner Alphabet Inc. recently pledged to change the part of its business that relies on records of users’ browsing across websites, while Apple Inc. is adding strict new privacy protections for its device users.
AT&T Inc. automatically enrolls wireless subscribers in a basic ad program that pools them into groups based on inferred interests, such as sports or buying a car. An enhanced version of the program shares more-detailed personal information with partners from customers who opt into it.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS​

Would you find interest-based ads on your phone helpful or intrusive? Join the conversation below.

Verizon Communications Inc. likewise pools subscriber data before sharing inferences about them with advertisers, with a more-detailed sharing program called Verizon Selects for users who enroll. Its separate Verizon Media division shares data gathered through its Yahoo and AOL brands.

T-Mobile said it masks users’ identities to prevent advertisers and other companies from knowing what websites they visit or apps they have installed. The company tags the data with an encoded user or device ID to protect the customers’ anonymity.
But privacy groups say those IDs can be linked back to people by comparing different data sets.
“It’s hard to say with a straight face, ‘We’re not going to share your name with it,’ ” said Aaron Mackey, a lawyer for the San Francisco-based Electronic Frontier Foundation, a consumer-privacy advocate. “This type of data is very personal and revealing, and it’s trivial to link that deidentified info back to you.”

Past telecom-industry efforts to take a piece of a multibillion-dollar digital ad market have stumbled more because of competitive pressures than privacy concerns.
After spending more than $9 billion to acquire Yahoo and AOL, Verizon has scaled back its internet ambitions and written down more than $4 billion. The company has also sold assets and cut jobs after the business failed to loosen Facebook Inc.’s and Google’s grip on the digital-ad market.

AT&T spent $1.6 billion in 2018 to buy AppNexus, a digital ad exchange that formed the cornerstone of an ambitious bid to compete with Silicon Valley companies for online video advertising. The Wall Street Journal last year reported that much of that ad division, called Xandr, was for sale after the company’s revenue growth missed executives’ original expectations.
AT&T’s and Verizon’s digital-ad operations still dwarf T-Mobile’s. T-Mobile bought Seattle startup PushSpring in 2019 to improve its business with marketers seeking to serve customers more-targeted ads. T-Mobile’s ad and search sales that year amounted to $506 million, a sliver of its $45 billion in revenue.
U.S. law restricts how phone companies handle “customer proprietary network information” such as call logs and billing information, though there are few federal limits on how carriers use the troves of data generated by modern smartphones.
The Federal Trade Commission in 2019 ordered several providers of wireless and cable internet services to reveal information about their privacy practices, but has yet to publish new information about the inquiry. Acting Chairwoman Rebecca Slaughter last month said she wants the commission to release a report on its findings by the end of the year.

HOW TO OPT OUT​


  • T‑Mobile: In the T‑Mobile app, visit the MORE tab, Advertising & Analytics, Use my data to make ads more relevant to me. Turn the toggle off (gray) to stop. On MyT‑Mobile.com, click the My account drop down, Profile, Privacy and Notifications, Advertising & Analytics, Use my data to make ads more relevant to me. Turn the toggle off (gray) to stop.
  • Metro: Log in to the MyMetro mobile application or on https://www.metrobyT-Mobile.com/iba. You must be on a mobile device to access your settings through the browser. On the MyMetro app or the mobile website, visit the Account tab, Network and Location Settings, Use my data to make ads more relevant to me. Turn the toggle off (gray) to stop.
  • Sprint: Go to Sprint account (Login To Profile). Visit My Account, Preferences, Scroll down to All about my account, Select Manage advertising and analytics preferences, Select the line you would like to update, then Use my data to make ads more relevant to me. Click the ‘OFF’ radio button to stop.
  • AT&T: All wireless customers are automatically enrolled in the basic Relevant Advertising program. You can opt out at https://www.att.com/cmpchoice
  • Verizon: Log in to Verizon Wireless account at My Verizon Log In, Sign in to your Verizon Wireless or Fios Account or call 1-(866) 211-0874. You will need to make changes to each line on your account. To opt out of the Relevant Online Advertising program, log into My Verizon app, Go to Services section, Click on Internet, Select the Manage Online Advertising Preferences link within My Internet Service
Write to Drew FitzGerald at andrew.fitzgerald@wsj.com
 

johnlocke

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Elon Musk Says Tesla Won’t Share Data From Its Cars With China or U.S.​

Beijing has restricted use of Tesla cars by military personnel or employees of some state-owned companies over national-security concerns​



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Tesla CEO Elon Musk addressed the China Development Forum in Beijing remotely on Saturday.​

PHOTO: WU HONG/SHUTTERSTOCK
By
Trefor Moss
March 20, 2021 3:57 am ET

SHANGHAI— Tesla Inc. TSLA 0.26% would never provide the U.S. government with data collected by its vehicles in China or other countries, Elon Musk, the company’s chief executive, told a high-level conference in China.
Mr. Musk’s assurance that Chinese customer data is fully protected followed the Chinese government’s decision to restrict the use of Tesla cars by military personnel or employees of key state-owned companies, as first reported by the Journal on Friday. Beijing had acted out of concern that sensitive data such as images taken by the cars’ cameras could be sent to the U.S., according to people familiar with the matter.

Speaking via video link Saturday to the government-backed China Development Forum in Beijing, Mr. Musk said that no U.S. or Chinese company would risk gathering sensitive or private data and then sharing it with their home government.
“Whether it’s Chinese or U.S., the negative effects if a commercial company did engage in spying—the negative effects for that company would be extremely bad,” Mr. Musk said. If Tesla used its cars to spy in any country, he said, it would be shut down everywhere, which he called “a very strong incentive for us to be very confidential.”


Concerns about commercial espionage have become overblown, Mr. Musk said, citing the case of the video platform TikTok—owned by Chinese tech company Bytedance Ltd.—which faced a U.S. ban last year before being reprieved.
“Even if there was spying, what would the other country learn and would it actually matter? If it doesn’t matter, it’s not worth thinking about that much,” Mr. Musk said. U.S. concerns about Chinese spying via TikTok are irrational, he argued: The platform’s videos mostly show people “just doing silly dances.”

Tesla has been seen as a model foreign company in China. It won strong support from Shanghai authorities to set up in the city, and in 2018 became the first foreign auto maker in China to gain approval for a wholly owned factory—that is, without a local joint-venture partner. Chinese state banks financed the project.

China has also become a core market for Tesla, last year accounting for about a quarter of its global sales of roughly 500,000 vehicles.

While continuing to expand the Shanghai plant and ramp up local production of the Model 3 sedan and the Model Y compact crossover vehicle, Tesla had its first serious run-in with the Chinese authorities last month. The State Administration for Market Regulation, the country’s top market regulator, publicly rebuked the company over quality issues.
Tesla responded with a statement saying it “sincerely accepted the guidance of government departments” and would make improvements having “deeply reflected on [its] shortcomings.’
 
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