The Economy and Economics

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johnlocke

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And once that is done, they will tax it out of existence.

I am going to have to find a local B&M that carries what I need for juice, but that is going to be difficult.

What type do you like, brand, flavor, etc? I frequent smoke shops that carry all that stuff when I'm looking for stuff for weed and such. I can keep an eye open.
 

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What type do you like, brand, flavor, etc? I frequent smoke shops that carry all that stuff when I'm looking for stuff for weed and such. I can keep an eye open.
I appreciate it. It's not so much the brand but how it's made. I've only ever been able to find three brands. The little shop I spoke of above was Heather's Heavenly Vapes.

But it's all tobacco flavor, but it's not artificial. They are NET or naturally extracted tobacco. It's a process where they use real tobacco leaves and steep them to extract all the flavor and compounds. It was what I needed to finally give up cigarettes as nicotine is not the only compound that my brain wants. The NET's have those other compounds because of the process used.

I just ordered one I found from a company called Black Note that hasn't shut down yet, but I'm a little discouraged as they say they shouldn't be used in sub-ohm devices, without really giving a reason why.

So anyway, yeah, if you see any NET juices anywhere, I'd love to know and would travel to buy a healthy amount if I like it.
 
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johnlocke

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I appreciate it. It's not so much the brand but how it's made. I've only ever been able to find three brands. The little shop I spoke of above was Heather's Heavenly Vapes.

But it's all tobacco flavor, but it's not artificial. They are NET or naturally extracted tobacco. It's a process where they use real tobacco leaves and steep them to extract all the flavor and compounds. It was what I needed to finally give up cigarettes as nicotine is not the only compound that my brain wants. The NET's have those other compounds because of the process used.

I just ordered one I found from a company called Black Note that hasn't shut down yet, but I'm a little discouraged as they say they shouldn't be used in sub-ohm devices, without really giving a reason why.

So anyway, yeah, if you see any NET juices anywhere, I'd love to know and would travel to buy a healthy amount if I like it.

OK. I'll check around my area.
 
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johnlocke

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A global business tax is an awful, strangling, and counter-productive plan. No Bueno.

A G-7 Deal on a Global Minimum Tax for Companies Faces Hurdles​

Many governments are likely to wait and see what others, especially a divided U.S. Congress, will do to put the deal into effect​

im-349519

G-7 finance ministers, including U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, meeting in London on Friday.​

PHOTO: STEFAN ROUSSEAU/PRESS POOL
By
Richard Rubin
,
Paul Hannon
and
Sam Schechner
June 6, 2021 5:59 pm ET

An agreement by wealthy countries to impose minimum taxes on multinational companies faces a rocky path to implementation, with many governments likely to wait and see what others, especially a divided U.S. Congress, will do.

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen hailed the deal, reached by finance ministers of the Group of Seven leading nations over the weekend in London. She called it a return to multilateralism and a sign that countries can tighten the tax net on profitable firms to fund their governments.
The agreement represents a turning point in long-running negotiations over where and how corporate profits should be taxed. The deal would impose a minimum tax of at least 15% and give countries more authority to tax the profits of digital companies like Apple Inc. and Facebook Inc. that dominate global markets but pay relatively little tax in many countries where they operate.

While the impact on tech companies remains uncertain, some welcomed the prospect of a more uniform global regime. Nick Clegg, Facebook Inc.’s vice president of global affairs, said on Twitter that the deal is a “step toward certainty for businesses” when it comes to taxes.
 
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A case study in the impracticality because of the immoraty of minimum wage laws by my buddy in Norway.

1623077505422.png

Thankfully, when I began working as an apprentice in advertising in Drammen, at age 17 in 1976, there was no goddamn minimum wage enforced in Norway (and I don't think we have one now, even, but I am not certain).

So the ad agency offered me 9.30 kroner per hour. My best friend was then working in a men's clothing store on Saturdays, and he was getting 18 kroner. But I gladly took my lowly paid apprentice job -- for I knew I would learn and eventually improve my lot.

Half a year later, I quit that job, because I had a very long daily commute from Oslo to Drammen. I looked around for a new job in Oslo -- but after a few weeks, my old boss badly wanted me back. So then I named my price: 50 kroner per hour. He accepted, and I returned for three more months. After that, I went freelance for Oslo agencies -- and I charged all my clients 75 kroner.

But if there had been a minimum wage back then, at, say, those 18 kroner my friend was getting -- I would likely never have gotten my inexperienced foot in that ad agency's door.

Minimum wage is a Great Evil -- it violates the rights of both Employers and Employees to enter into the kinds of work contracts which they find mutually acceptable.
 

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Baron Samedi

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I’m sure the economic crash is JUST around the corner!

No, it's here. Stagflation, economic crash with GDP propped up by money printing.

In Keynesian economics, economic growth is measured in GDP, and GDP is measured in dollars, so all you have to do to offset a shrinking GDP and economic recession is print lots and lots of dollars, generate lots of inflation, and then count the dollars you printed as GDP growth. They'll point to the stock market too, because stocks are where inflation goes in America, so it is apparent growth, but actually it's just inflation, because the rising stock prices are disassociated from any actual productivity.

You print the money, give it to your rich banker Wall Street Friends, who buy up stocks and commodities with that freshly printed money, and drive the prices of stock up...but that kind of GDP growth reflects nothing but a massive wealth transfer from the bottom to the top, because by the time that money reaches teh average person, all the prices in the economy have already adjusted to the new money supply, so average folks derive no benefit from it.

That's why the rich get richer and the poor get poorer. This "infrastructure bill" is a perfect example of how you make rich people richer and poor people poorer, and convince them that they aren't because just look at those stock markets and GDP!

And most people, who have no clue why the rich keep getting richer, cheer on every new money printing bill, thereby screwing themselves harder and harder, every time, and despite their personal pain, they allow themselves to believe what they are told, because the stock market is booming and GDP is going up, while they eat their Rahmen noodles and Kraft macaroni for dinner.
 

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Gas prices are up 52% from April 2020 to April 2021. That did not factor in the cyber attack on the pipeline.
Just about everything that you buy today is more expensive than it was 6 months ago.
Yet the Government is telling us that there is no inflation.
I guess that they figure that the US has become a nation of morons and they could be right.
 

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Wait wait, the gas prices are higher now because they are converting from winter to summer gas.... :coffee:

I actually saw someone post that here months ago, forgot who though.
 

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A case study in the impracticality because of the immoraty of minimum wage laws by my buddy in Norway.

View attachment 4316

Thankfully, when I began working as an apprentice in advertising in Drammen, at age 17 in 1976, there was no goddamn minimum wage enforced in Norway (and I don't think we have one now, even, but I am not certain).

So the ad agency offered me 9.30 kroner per hour. My best friend was then working in a men's clothing store on Saturdays, and he was getting 18 kroner. But I gladly took my lowly paid apprentice job -- for I knew I would learn and eventually improve my lot.

Half a year later, I quit that job, because I had a very long daily commute from Oslo to Drammen. I looked around for a new job in Oslo -- but after a few weeks, my old boss badly wanted me back. So then I named my price: 50 kroner per hour. He accepted, and I returned for three more months. After that, I went freelance for Oslo agencies -- and I charged all my clients 75 kroner.

But if there had been a minimum wage back then, at, say, those 18 kroner my friend was getting -- I would likely never have gotten my inexperienced foot in that ad agency's door.

Minimum wage is a Great Evil -- it violates the rights of both Employers and Employees to enter into the kinds of work contracts which they find mutually acceptable.
I believe it was .75 an hour when I first started working at 15. Went up to $1 an hour when I went in the Army after graduating from HS.
 
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