The non-political Coronavirus thread

gomezcat

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I hate working at home too, did it for over a decade in the past, not by my real choice. My current employer sent me home for April and May, and it wasn't TOO bad, because I still got to go in for partial days 2x/week. I would probably like it if it were 2 days home, 3 days at the office.

I hate not having my workout place open...it's been a struggle to keep up with a routine. I do something pretty much every day, but not as much as I was doing there. They are sort of opening next week, few classes, lots of restrictions. We'll see how that goes.

I hate not having my Italian lessons too. They do them on skype. but it's the same price. I told the instructor I won't be back until it is in person.

I hate not seeing my friends who are not wanting to see anyone in person right now.

The worst thing is the effect on my dad. My parents have been in a retirement place for 2 years and my dad is very social (my mom is very antisocial). I really believe that his not being able to leave the facility or see me for 7+ mos has contributed to his rapid mental decline. :(

Now, there ARE actually a few good things that have come of this.
One, more time to read books
Two, free Sunday Ticket
Three, i had time, since i was working at home to bring home and introduce in a slow way a new rescue cat.😻

Let's hear some good things! Almost every situation has a good thing or two.
Ah yes. Our rescue cat has adapted to us being at home. Initially, she wasn't impressed, but she has learned to go into our bedroom for peace and quiet.
 

johnlocke

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We've also been working from home since March, unsurprisingly. We have a two bed apartment in suburban London. The neighbours (currently) are fine but the walls are thin. I don't like beng able to hear others, so find it difficult to work from home.

I've saved a shitload of money through not having to pay transport costs (£30 per week) and through not buying "stuff" at work - coffees, lunches etc.

However, I feel more depressed and anxious, although that's a default setting for me anyway. My weight isn't good, but I've managed to only put a bit on.

I sometimes go out for walks, but motivation dips and I make excuses not to go out.

I've started going back to the office one day a week and it helps. I work for a Veterans' housing provider, so some staff do need to be on site. I make sure to travel in when it's quiet. However, that's actually really easy to do as so many Londoners are working from home.

Long-term, I'm mostly able to do my job from home, but would want 1 or 2 days per week outside, to break things up. Mrs Cat feels the same.

One thing I don't like about myself is how judgemental I am of people who get too close. Given that I understand where the risk lies (close, sustained contact in poorly ventilated areas), I get quite abrupt when people pass too close. I need to work on it, or else I'll go nuts.

I miss things like 🏈 (the Summer season here got cancelled). I do stats and miss the buzz of being on the sideline and so on. Watching the game that close is a shitload better for me. It's really interactive and the camaraderie is great.

I also going to the pub. They're open but I'm mostly avoiding them. I also miss seeing friends who live elsewhere/abroad.

I'm clinging on to the (I think) Farsi phrase: this too shall pass.

Be well, my buddy.
 

HSanders

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Ah yes. Our rescue cat has adapted to us being at home. Initially, she wasn't impressed, but she has learned to go into our bedroom for peace and quiet.
Methinks too much more of this "food suppliers working from home" stuff could lead to a massive revolt by cats. 😄
 

Patriots71

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A while back I think johnlocke started a similar thread and it didn't take long for it to get political.
I did not start in political things, I just talked about it effects me like people did. There are some people who have different views on it, and thats ok. It gets frustrating at times for those that really get affected by this and lose people to hear someone say its fake or a hoax, etc, but I am trying to be ok with people having opinions that are different to mine on this and be ok with it. This effects people different, some were really hurt by it, others not so much. There is a lot of misinformation and different sides that have been given, and the one thing that is a huge factor is, this is all new to Humans that are alive today. We are not experts on handling this kind of thing, so you have confusion, and drastic thoughts, and
not to mention the isolation and depression that goes along with it. Nobody wants to deal with it, it sucks, no matter what your thoughts are. Covid left a huge hole in my familes life over how it affected us. So that is how we deal with it. I am sure there is a person who lives in deep alaska who barely even knows its a thing. I guess I wrote all of that to say, everyone is going to be different and have different opinions on it, because its not the same across the board, so I will at the very least respect that about everyones thoughts on it.
 

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This is exactly what happened in my situation. Mom had dementia and was in a nursing home for five months when the virus forced the doors to be closed to the public on March 12th. Limited staff tried to FaceTime on occasion and mom struggled terribly because she didn't understand nor could she hear because they lost her hearing aids. The fact that I couldn't visit her to keep things in check was frustrating. On May 30th she was transported to the hospital alone after a minor fall. She was unable to answer when they asked "Did you hit your head?" so they felt it best she be sent to the hospital for X-rays. The next day she was gone. A pulmonary embolism led to respiratory failure. She passed comfortably and the hospital staff handled it well, but she was alone without family due to Coronavirus restrictions.

Five days later there was a small funeral with a limit of ten people social distancing.

"Utter cruelty" is an understatement.
I want to give you a virtual hug. 🫂

My mother passed away on February 19th. It was about three weeks later when the nursing home where she had been a resident was locked down. While I would never have been ready to say goodbye to her, I am thankful that her passing came at a time when I could be with her every day during the last weeks. Thankful that I was able to hold her hand as she drew her last breath. And, thankful that we could have a funeral where I could freely accept the comforting hugs given by all who came to honor her memory.

"Utter cruelty" is correct and I am so sorry that this happened to you and your mother. :cry:
 

shecolt

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My wife is an elementary school special education teacher. So her profession went to hell in a handbasket in mid March. It’s next to impossible to get special needs students to focus when you’re standing right in front of them and completely impossible on zoom calls. That is, when you can get your parents to have them even participate remotely. Unfortunately, in many school districts it is the lower socio economic status parents that have more special education needs and quite frankly, as mean as this sounds, they are not as willing to work to get their kids what they need.

Her school district is somewhat rural and they went back face-to-face the Tuesday after Labor Day. It is still been a tremendous challenge for her given the requirements for masks and social distancing etc. At 55 years old and 30 years in it is easy to see this has moved up early retirement date thinking.

I have worked from home since 2010 and the rest of my company went remote about the third week in March. For me it has been 50% the same and 50% completely different, professionally. I am in high-tech sales and while all my clients are quite willing to meet virtually, it does have an impact on my ability to build relationships and establish camaraderie with potential clients and even my long-term clients. I can feel some of these relationships slipping without the in person meetings.

All three of my children are in college and two of them are home working remotely. They hate it. My youngest (our daughter) is living in East Lansing at her sorority house. Michigan State is a barren place right now as
dormitories are almost completely empty 100% of the classes have gone online. Still, I’m glad that she’s up there experiencing some part of the college life as a sophomore.

Like others on here, my mother is in a nursing home and we have been unable to visit her except through her closed window since March. It is tough to watch her decline cognitively. I’m positive that in person visits would help her stay more aware.

We have been meeting with financial advisors (remotely) to try to determine if we can make the jump to retire. I’m going to be 52 and we have been saving our pennies and it may look like getting out in the next 12 months is a smart move considering the stress we are all experiencing from our careers. Much of this depends on where the country goes in terms of lockdowns and a return to normalcy.

Only one person in our wide circles has had Covid, the symptoms were mild and he’s in a category that is considered dangerous. He’s fully recovered. Other than that, we don’t even know anybody who has tested positive.

We have no fear of this virus at this point. Our concerns are 100% around what it is doing to society. A move south from Michigan is in the definitely cards.

I hope all is good for you and yours.
I want to reply specifically to what you wrote about your wife because if there is one good thing to come out of all this, I think it may be that more have realized what a vital role teachers play in our lives and that it is not an easy job.

My granddaughter was in a special needs PK class last year. I won't bore you with the long story, but it wasn't a case of her having learning disabilities. It was a case of her having physical needs. On two occasions, I was invited to observe her class and saw first hand what a difficult job someone like your wife has.

My granddaughter would have been in a regular Kindergarten class this year; but due to her being in the highly vulnerable group because she has to take anti-rejection meds, my daughter chose remote learning for her and her older brother. So far, my daughter has been highly pleased with remote learning and impressed that the school system had hired a separate principal to oversee the remote learning program.

However, she often gets upset with the parents of those in the remote Kindergarten class. My daughter is the type who has to remind herself to back off and remember that she wouldn't be there if the teaching was done in a regular classroom. So, she gets annoyed when the teacher has to spend several minutes just trying to get a child to take the blankets off her head. Annoyed when a little boy says that his Chromebook needs charged, but can't charge it because he doesn't know where the charger is and doesn't want to wake up his mother to ask her.

Since we are talking about 5-year olds here, I often wonder why some parents chose remote learning if they aren't going to be available to help both the teacher and their child. My daughter has often said that my granddaughter's teacher deserves a special place in heaven. I think that applies to all teachers who are working so hard in less than favorable conditions (both remote and in school). So, please give your wife a big THANK YOU from me.
 

Dwight Schrute

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The answer - for some, probably a lot more than we think - is in your post:

a 5 yr old in remote learning and mom is still in bed.

if the kid needed a ride or to make the bus mom would have to be up to make sure that took place (I hope). Remote? Nah. This cats sleeping in!

sad
 

Hawg73

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My wife and I are retired and are therefore less affected by Covid than many folks we know. I do feel fortunate in that regard, but, since it affects everybody and everything, it is has not been any day at the beach for us, either.

I figure that everybody has to sort through the complex and often contradictory Covid information out there and let their comfort level dictate what they will and won't do, regardless of how scientifically valid those things may be or not. I can't sit there and berate somebody or feel like I have a better handle on reality because they are doing something I think is ridiculous, such as wearing a mask while driving alone or walking down an empty street, but.....there are WTFs aplenty out there.

At the risk of griping about minor issues and coming off as a bitchy jackass, we had big plans for the year that had to be scrapped. No trip to Italy, no Patriots games, no backpacking trip with the boys, etc. etc. We tried to adapt with more day trips to the beach. Still went sailing, out to brew pubs and ate outdoors. I played a fair amount of golf, saw a little bit of live music, went for day hikes and hosted cookouts. Life is still pretty effing good. I'm not sitting in front of the TV being spellbound by David Muir's fear-mongering rhetoric like a lot of people out there.

Covid can take away my trips to Gillette to see the Pats, but it can't stop me from hosting "tailgating" parties in my back yard every week. Like Bill Belichick you game plan for your opponent and take advantage of what is there.

I can take a year of regular frustration and being limited, but I'm planning on next year being a full return to normal. Not the "new normal" but actual normal with more hand washing.

Call me delusional, but this chapter in human history will pass and if it gets me before it does then it gets me. I ain't going to live in fear or hide in my house.
 

aloyouis

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I want to reply specifically to what you wrote about your wife because if there is one good thing to come out of all this, I think it may be that more have realized what a vital role teachers play in our lives and that it is not an easy job.

My granddaughter was in a special needs PK class last year. I won't bore you with the long story, but it wasn't a case of her having learning disabilities. It was a case of her having physical needs. On two occasions, I was invited to observe her class and saw first hand what a difficult job someone like your wife has.

My granddaughter would have been in a regular Kindergarten class this year; but due to her being in the highly vulnerable group because she has to take anti-rejection meds, my daughter chose remote learning for her and her older brother. So far, my daughter has been highly pleased with remote learning and impressed that the school system had hired a separate principal to oversee the remote learning program.

However, she often gets upset with the parents of those in the remote Kindergarten class. My daughter is the type who has to remind herself to back off and remember that she wouldn't be there if the teaching was done in a regular classroom. So, she gets annoyed when the teacher has to spend several minutes just trying to get a child to take the blankets off her head. Annoyed when a little boy says that his Chromebook needs charged, but can't charge it because he doesn't know where the charger is and doesn't want to wake up his mother to ask her.

Since we are talking about 5-year olds here, I often wonder why some parents chose remote learning if they aren't going to be available to help both the teacher and their child. My daughter has often said that my granddaughter's teacher deserves a special place in heaven. I think that applies to all teachers who are working so hard in less than favorable conditions (both remote and in school). So, please give your wife a big THANK YOU from me.
I just passed along your message. She was touched. :)

Over her career she has taught at various levels of ability in the special education field All in the same school district. As you correctly pointed out above, sometimes students are in special ed not because of cognitive issues but because of physical challenges. When we first started dating back in the early 90s she was teaching in what was called then the EMI room (educable mentally impaired) these were students with both physical and cognitive disabilities. IQ levels as low as 45. The unfortunate part for students in special ed due only to physical needs is that the teacher and or programs can only go as fast as the least capable students, often times. I hope your daughter is able to get through this COVID time with your granddaughter and she can ultimately move into a regular Ed environment.

Over the course of our marriage I have been listening to her “job“ stories and she’s been listening to mine and it’s funny how we both have become familiar with each others career likes, dislikes and general situation. I can tell you with 100% confidence that the parents are the biggest factor in a child’s success in the special Ed environment. It sounds like your granddaughter has a good one. Teachers really do want parents that are involved and that openly advocate for their kids.
 

Patriots71

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I want to reply specifically to what you wrote about your wife because if there is one good thing to come out of all this, I think it may be that more have realized what a vital role teachers play in our lives and that it is not an easy job.

My granddaughter was in a special needs PK class last year. I won't bore you with the long story, but it wasn't a case of her having learning disabilities. It was a case of her having physical needs. On two occasions, I was invited to observe her class and saw first hand what a difficult job someone like your wife has.

My granddaughter would have been in a regular Kindergarten class this year; but due to her being in the highly vulnerable group because she has to take anti-rejection meds, my daughter chose remote learning for her and her older brother. So far, my daughter has been highly pleased with remote learning and impressed that the school system had hired a separate principal to oversee the remote learning program.

However, she often gets upset with the parents of those in the remote Kindergarten class. My daughter is the type who has to remind herself to back off and remember that she wouldn't be there if the teaching was done in a regular classroom. So, she gets annoyed when the teacher has to spend several minutes just trying to get a child to take the blankets off her head. Annoyed when a little boy says that his Chromebook needs charged, but can't charge it because he doesn't know where the charger is and doesn't want to wake up his mother to ask her.

Since we are talking about 5-year olds here, I often wonder why some parents chose remote learning if they aren't going to be available to help both the teacher and their child. My daughter has often said that my granddaughter's teacher deserves a special place in heaven. I think that applies to all teachers who are working so hard in less than favorable conditions (both remote and in school). So, please give your wife a big THANK YOU from me.
Yeah my wife is a teacher as well 5th grade science. They are still all remote learning for another week and then its parent choice. My wife teaches in a very poor area, so she has kids that literally live in shelters. I wonder what kind of turn out she will have. Who will send their kids to school, who will keep them home. She has students that are literally having to watch their baby brothers while in class because parents are asleep.
 

Big/Sky/Fly

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We’re currently traveling in New England and so far have not had any issues other than a mask nazi on one of our flights. Having to fill out a form while staying in a hotel in Maine has been the toughest thing we have had to deal with so far. Even staying in Boston overnight was cake, as long as we had our masks on everything has been peachy.
1 more night in Maine (Freeport) to visit L. L. Bean and we head back to RI in the morning.
It’s kinda funny because I always assumed Alaska was one of the freeist states in the nation but I am not looking forward to having to deal with the clowns at the airport. We’ll see what happens when we get back I reckon.


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