What Movies Have You Recently Watched?

ParanoidPatriot

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A really good old movie that I watched again on DVD is Gettysburg. It's about 20 years old and 4 hours long. It was originally filmed to be shown on TNT cable station. But, it got so many excellent reviews that they released it to cinema's.
That's where I saw it.
A month ago I was thinking about it so I got the DVD from Netflixs. It was even better watching it that way because you can rewind certain scenes a watch it over.
Highly recommended.
 

O_P_T

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Anything you create in free form can be art. Are we really having this discussion? FFS...

Clearly a sign of the end times, I agree with BSF.

"Art" is an act of creation by the artist. Exactly what they are creating is, by definition, up to their own personal definition.

This doesn't mean that everyone will apricate/like/enjoy any given piece of art, or at times even be able to know if any given thing actually is "art".

I can recall one time I was at MOMA and saw some yellow caution tape at the opening to an alcove, where there were buckets of dry wall paste and a man-lift, and I had no idea if this was simply a spot workers had left their stuff, or if it was "art".

It actually doesn't matter.

If someone thought that was "art" and had worked to create it, then by definition it was "art". IMHO I would consider such a piece as ludicrous junk, but to each his own.

Just as with John Locke's not liking "drama" in his shows/books. That's his cup of tea, not mine.

IMHO, if a character never has any doubt as to what to do, and is absolutely certain as to what is "right" and "proper", then there is no possibility for character growth.

I personally find stories that include character growth "better" because it relates to the real world. We all have our failings and can find inspiration for our own growth in such stories.

If you come across someone in the real world who is always absolutely certain as to what is "right" and "proper" and never has any doubts, then it's quite possible that they are a psychopath or an ideologue, and so bear watching.

And before anyone has a Harrumph over this, please note I said "possible", not "probable".
 

O_P_T

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A really good old movie that I watched again on DVD is Gettysburg. It's about 20 years old and 4 hours long. It was originally filmed to be shown on TNT cable station. But, it got so many excellent reviews that they released it to cinema's.
That's where I saw it.
A month ago I was thinking about it so I got the DVD from Netflixs. It was even better watching it that way because you can rewind certain scenes a watch it over.
Highly recommended.

Yeah, I bought it on Amazon Prime to get a HD version of it.

My only issue with it, is that it was clearly shot thinking it would be shown on early '90's TV's, meaning the old 480 SD.

I would have preferred to see it in wide screen format.

BTW, I did a vacation at Gettysburg. One gets a completely different idea of the battle when one walks the ground.
 

johnlocke

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Clearly a sign of the end times, I agree with BSF.

"Art" is an act of creation by the artist. Exactly what they are creating is, by definition, up to their own personal definition.

This doesn't mean that everyone will apricate/like/enjoy any given piece of art, or at times even be able to know if any given thing actually is "art".

I can recall one time I was at MOMA and saw some yellow caution tape at the opening to an alcove, where there were buckets of dry wall paste and a man-lift, and I had no idea if this was simply a spot workers had left their stuff, or if it was "art".

It actually doesn't matter.

If someone thought that was "art" and had worked to create it, then by definition it was "art". IMHO I would consider such a piece as ludicrous junk, but to each his own.

Just as with John Locke's not liking "drama" in his shows/books. That's his cup of tea, not mine.

IMHO, if a character never has any doubt as to what to do, and is absolutely certain as to what is "right" and "proper", then there is no possibility for character growth.

I personally find stories that include character growth "better" because it relates to the real world. We all have our failings and can find inspiration for our own growth in such stories.

If you come across someone in the real world who is always absolutely certain as to what is "right" and "proper" and never has any doubts, then it's quite possible that they are a psychopath or an ideologue, and so bear watching.

And before anyone has a Harrumph over this, please note I said "possible", not "probable".

I did not in any way even intimate a dislike of drama.

Wow.
 

Flagg the Wanderer

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A really good old movie that I watched again on DVD is Gettysburg. It's about 20 years old and 4 hours long. It was originally filmed to be shown on TNT cable station. But, it got so many excellent reviews that they released it to cinema's.
That's where I saw it.
A month ago I was thinking about it so I got the DVD from Netflixs. It was even better watching it that way because you can rewind certain scenes a watch it over.
Highly recommended.
Whoa.

You just reminded me that Netflix sends DVDs. I'd totally forgotten about that.
 

Undertaker #59*

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Say what?
A long time ago, before streaming was much of a thing, Netflix started as a DVD rental company. They had several different plans, but the most popular one was 3 DVDs at a time for a set price per month. So you paid that subscription price and could always have 3 DVDs out at a time. When you watched one, you dropped it in the mailbox in a postage paid envelope and when they received it, they would automatically send you the next movie on your list.

I was a member of this service for many years.

Eventually, they offered streaming, but this was before apps and smart TVs. So you could stream movies on your computer. I didn't use it, but it was popular and successful.

At one point, both halves of this business were doing so well that they announced they were going to split into two different companies - one for streaming, one for rentals. And of course two separate subscriptions.

There was a huge public outcry and they abandoned that.

Today, Netflix is ubiquitous with streaming, but the other half of the business still exists. You can sign up for and rent DVDs by mail for a set price per month. And a surcharge for blueray. And probably another for UHD, if they offer it. They didn't last time I checked.
 

ParanoidPatriot

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Whoa.

You just reminded me that Netflix sends DVDs. I'd totally forgotten about that.
Yup, I signed up for that years ago. Use to get 2 at a time but changed it to 1 during the pandemic when they weren't making many new movies.
But it's a lot cheaper than paying for downloads. Now I get them a couple of days later because the USPS is screwed up. I also have the streaming and Amazon prime. But with the Blu-ray I can get the new movies that usually are not on either.
 

BostonTim

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Clearly a sign of the end times, I agree with BSF.

"Art" is an act of creation by the artist. Exactly what they are creating is, by definition, up to their own personal definition.

This doesn't mean that everyone will apricate/like/enjoy any given piece of art, or at times even be able to know if any given thing actually is "art".

I can recall one time I was at MOMA and saw some yellow caution tape at the opening to an alcove, where there were buckets of dry wall paste and a man-lift, and I had no idea if this was simply a spot workers had left their stuff, or if it was "art".

It actually doesn't matter.

If someone thought that was "art" and had worked to create it, then by definition it was "art". IMHO I would consider such a piece as ludicrous junk, but to each his own.

Just as with John Locke's not liking "drama" in his shows/books. That's his cup of tea, not mine.

IMHO, if a character never has any doubt as to what to do, and is absolutely certain as to what is "right" and "proper", then there is no possibility for character growth.

I personally find stories that include character growth "better" because it relates to the real world. We all have our failings and can find inspiration for our own growth in such stories.

If you come across someone in the real world who is always absolutely certain as to what is "right" and "proper" and never has any doubts, then it's quite possible that they are a psychopath or an ideologue, and so bear watching.

And before anyone has a Harrumph over this, please note I said "possible", not "probable".
Art is an elusive little critter, O.P.T. says "This here is my Art." BostomTim says, "You call that Art????? Nobody's right, nobody's wrong.

Cheers
 

johnlocke

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Clearly a sign of the end times, I agree with BSF.

"Art" is an act of creation by the artist. Exactly what they are creating is, by definition, up to their own personal definition.

This doesn't mean that everyone will apricate/like/enjoy any given piece of art, or at times even be able to know if any given thing actually is "art".

I can recall one time I was at MOMA and saw some yellow caution tape at the opening to an alcove, where there were buckets of dry wall paste and a man-lift, and I had no idea if this was simply a spot workers had left their stuff, or if it was "art".

It actually doesn't matter.

If someone thought that was "art" and had worked to create it, then by definition it was "art". IMHO I would consider such a piece as ludicrous junk, but to each his own.

Just as with John Locke's not liking "drama" in his shows/books. That's his cup of tea, not mine.

IMHO, if a character never has any doubt as to what to do, and is absolutely certain as to what is "right" and "proper", then there is no possibility for character growth.

I personally find stories that include character growth "better" because it relates to the real world. We all have our failings and can find inspiration for our own growth in such stories.

If you come across someone in the real world who is always absolutely certain as to what is "right" and "proper" and never has any doubts, then it's quite possible that they are a psychopath or an ideologue, and so bear watching.

And before anyone has a Harrumph over this, please note I said "possible", not "probable".

Pretty sad way of viewing things and humanity.

Wow.
 

O_P_T

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Art is an elusive little critter, O.P.T. says "This here is my Art." BostomTim says, "You call that Art????? Nobody's right, nobody's wrong.

Cheers

"Art" isn't the end product, it's the process.

The process is an effort to represent "something", in some other form. Be it words, music, visual, or performance.

Are the stick figures a two year old puts on paper "art"?

Yes, because that two year old is trying to put his/her ideas into physical form.

Does that make it "good"?

That is a matter of taste.

Oh and if one wants to put the "beautiful" parameter on this, let me ask you a simple question.

Define a "beautiful" woman.

Today the general definition is of a woman who is a whole lot skinnier than in years past.

Just take a look at what a "Rubenesque" woman looks like. Or for that matter, what a "beautiful" Polynesian woman looked like back in the day.

They would be called "fat" today.

Back then, women who were "skinny" were thought to be so poor that they couldn't afford enough food. If you were plump, you obviously ate enough.

Back then food scarcity was common, so being "plump" was "hot".

None of those woman from the before time would be considered "beautiful" today, by most men, which proves, assuming it even needs one, that beauty is subjective and not absolute.
 
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Big/Sky/Fly

Big/Sky/Fly

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"Art" isn't the end product, it's the process.

The process is an effort to represent "something", in some other form. Be it words, music, visual, or performance.

Are the stick figures a two year old puts on paper "art"?

Yes, because that two year old is trying to put his/her ideas into physical form.

Does that make it "good"?

That is a matter of taste.

Oh and if one wants to put the "beautiful" parameter on this, let me ask you a simple question.

Define a "beautiful" woman.

Today the general definition is of a woman who is a whole lot skinnier than in years past.

Just take a look at what a "Rubenesque" woman looks like. Or for that matter, what a "beautiful" Polynesian woman looked like back in the day.

They would be called "fat" today.

Back then, women who were "skinny" were thought to be so poor that they couldn't afford enough food. If you were plump, you obviously ate enough.

Back then food scarcity was common, so being "plump" was "hot".

None of those woman from the before time would be considered "beautiful" today, by most men, which proves, assuming it even needs one, that beauty is subjective and not absolute.
Yup. It's so obvious that apparently some won't ever get it.

Art is very subjective. Art critics are like teachers. They can't create it themselves, but, they think that they can learnz the students on it. Art in its truest form comes from your intuition. Especially abstract. And again, art is subjective. Even art gallery owners mostly have no clue about it. They just want to sell it for as much as they can.

Art is subjective. Bottom line.
 
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Big/Sky/Fly

Big/Sky/Fly

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I already did.

The selective recreation of reality according to the artists metaphysical value judgements.
WTF?!?!

Abstract art has no such rules...fuck all rules. It's a state of mind.

TRUE art has no rules. It all comes from whatever you want it to. It is limitless. No official BS. No rules. No guidelines. Abstract is the best version of art because of the freedom that it brings. Not all abstract art sucks. Most of it is amazing.

There are different types of art. But, I prefer to not be limited in my options. Abstract is the best version of art. I've even heard some idiots tell me that abstract art has rules. Well, it isn't abstract then...it's something else.
 
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johnlocke

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WTF?!?!

Abstract art has no such rules...fuck all rules. It's a state of mind.

I could argue abstract isn't much for art. Those that create it however still do so based on the metaphysical value judgments. In the case of abstract art ones judgement tends to be that existence is incomprehensible.

Look, Winamps Milkdrop creates beautiful patterns and shit but Milkdrop is not creating art.
 
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Big/Sky/Fly

Big/Sky/Fly

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I could argue abstract isn't much for art. Those that create it however still do so based on the metaphysical value judgments. In the case of abstract art ones judgement tends to be that existence is incomprehensible.

Look, Winamps Milkdrop creates beautiful patterns and shit but Milkdrop is not creating art.
You simply either don't know what art is, or, you're doing it wrong. That is all.
 
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Big/Sky/Fly

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I could argue abstract isn't much for art. Those that create it however still do so based on the metaphysical value judgments. In the case of abstract art ones judgement tends to be that existence is incomprehensible.

Look, Winamps Milkdrop creates beautiful patterns and shit but Milkdrop is not creating art.
You have limits in your mind. I guess that's OK...if that's what you want.
 

johnlocke

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Beat poet extraodinaire Alan Ginsburg once wrote the word "Bong" over 30 times to make a square.

Poetry. Nah. Just puking on paper.
 
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