The STEM thread

johnlocke

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They should approach Ms Rand's estate and try to acquire a license for the Reardon name.

Cheers, :toast:

That would be epically priceless, man. Good thought. I mean MIT's super robot who my best friend growing up works on is named Atlas isn't it? I don't rightly remember.
 

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patsload

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It would be great if we had a thread devoted Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics where information like this could be posted.

:beer:
I couldn't find it for the life of me! Link it and I will bookmark for the future!
 
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RoadNasty

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Some properties are similar, but the MIT material is a polymer - it's made of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen. No metals (unless you consider hydrogen to be a metal).

You are spot on correct TIP - and I'd say both are quite interesting.
 

RoadNasty

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Here's an excellent "go to" site for Webb progress updates:

 

Hawg73

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Here's an excellent "go to" site for Webb progress updates:


Thanks for posting. The news this morning showed a "selfie" the Webb took of itself, but it
was blurry but I knew calibration would be necessary. The anchors didn't mention that,
which I thought would have been a useful thing for people unfamiliar to know, but the link
you provided illustrates that dialing the scope in is a complex process and I've bookmarked
so I can follow along.

I'm starting to get excited but we'll all have to have some patience.
 
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I just looked up the coordinates of that neutron star - it's visible (but not to the human eye) from here in the southern hemisphere.

Great stuff. I assume you know about this Tip?

Evidence of a rogue (?) black hole within the Milky Way.

I didn't know about that, but I do appreciate that you posted it.

I've always enjoyed reading hard science fiction about those topics: Larry Niven's Neutron Star collection of short stories, Frederick Pohl's Heechee Saga, and Stephen Baxter's novels about the Xeelee and the Photino Birds. My favorite, though, is Robert Forward's Dragon's Egg, which tells the story of a race of creatures living on the surface of a neutron star.

Reading Pohl's saga introduced me to the term kugelblitz - it's the energy equivalent of a black hole, a concentration of energy so dense it forms an event horizon.
 
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Some really good news for those of us whose hearing is not what it used to be.

 

BostonTim

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Some really good news for those of us whose hearing is not what it used to be.

Doubtlessly too late for me, but wow, that's fabulous. Real science (not bogus accepted science) experimentation being conducted by folks at MIT and countless like minded scientists at other fine venues is leading to a nearly infinite acceleration of progress in so many situations. I read that article and, being a victim of pretty severe hearing loss, I am immediately cheered by the hope for the future in hearing and a million other things,


Cheers, :thumb:
 
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